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Just back from bonnaroo, and back to the interstate grind tomorrow, amazing, truth be told lsd saved my life and helped me get me back on track toward aaccomplishing goals. From heroin addict to productive member of society. This week at bonnaroo I realized while tripping and having a short conversation with a lawyer from Manhattan, that trucking will not be my life's work and I want to go back to college. But we're do I go? Who do I talk to? How do I even start? I realized that this life I am living will eventually kill me. It has caused me to be outrageously antisocial, angry, Depressed, And alone. So I failed out of college. How do I start over and finish my undergraduate as a trucker online. Amazing revelations! I hate my mundane over regulated career. Help! We're do I go to get started? 

Edited by AsWeWindOnDownTheRoad
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I am a recovering addict who somehow managed to get through college. I would just start by applying. My path was community college & then I transferred to State. All relatively easy to get into & financial aid is available. Do you have a school in mind?

And if you don't mind me asking, is it your job that's affecting you negatively or the drugs & alcohol still?

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Hi, thanks for writing back, I think my job has a direct connection to why I am angry tired anti social, and alone all the time. I am so disconnected from society 100 percent of my life I spend by myself with 0 opportunity to create new relationships with anyone especially women. So pick a school, Ok, sounds easier than it is. I'm on the road, how do I register if I'm not there? And next how to declare a major in pre law? What do I do to work towards a law degree? Really confused because no one has a direct answer.

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13 minutes ago, Velvet Elvis said:

If you can survive the heat at 'roo, you can make it through anything.  

Dude it was so fregin hot out there!!! Almost didn't lol.  The thing is "I told althea im feeling lost, lacking in some direction"

nobody seems to be able to tell me what to do besides. "You need to come and sit down with a guidance counselor on such and such a date" I can't fugn do that! Not that I don't want to, but I can't just leave work especially after vacation to sit down and wait on a counselor! It will mess up our whole routine. Fucker won't talk to me over the phone! Any online comm college program you guys could recommend? Class is not an option. Because I have no set schedule.

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35 minutes ago, Velvet Elvis said:

Be aware that many online degree programs are scams.

This is true. You want to find one that has a major university behind it. The asu one I mentioned above does. Be careful of what comes up doing a Google search, for instance.

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I believe you can apply to most schools online these days. I'm not familiar with totally online programs, but all the schools I went to had some online options. I've heard Philosophy is a good major for students planning on going to law school. Good luck!

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Dittoing the caution about online programs.  The majority are crap and a small minority are great.  I unfortunately don't know enough to say what falls into which category. 

As for heading to law school - most schools don't have a pre-law major anymore and even if they do, I'd honestly recommend against it unless you really don't feel like there's a better option.  If they have "pre-law" type classes (like undergraduate courses that introduce you to legal topics or cases), those are more worthwhile.  But not a full major usually.

Most common is political science or government.  Philosophy and English are probably tied for second.  History usually comes in third.  Most of the other humanities areas are a rough equivalent after that, with hard sciences/math/comp sci coming toward the tail end but not non-existent (particularly for people who want to do patent law).

That's all a rough approximation with the disclaimer that it traces back about 5-7 years, so it may have changed.  But given the fairly predictable and stagnant nature of law schools and the people attracted to them, I wouldn't expect substantial changes.  In short, anything that helps with writing is a good plan, which is nearly everything, unless you happen to love science and math and want to go that route.  That's usually more the people who absolutely love it and then find themselves pulled toward law school for whatever reason, rather than people who start out with it as their plan.  And the joke is that it's also for anyone who couldn't do well on the MCAT so they took the LSAT afterward (medical standardized testing and law school standardized testing respectively).  Sadly, it's partially based in truth for some!

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Hey thanks everyone, fact is Im a vet so I get to go to school for free, and as a resident of connecticut now and during my time in service after my gi bill runs out the state will still cover %100 of tuition to any state school including 10 cc. Good news is my old cc has accepted me back and now I have to wait for a letter in the mail to make preperations to meet with my counselor, I'm also pretty sure I'm gonna get into the va this year god willing for medical. I have alot of f's so I'm gonna have to get all that info and figure out what to do with that. My cc has online courses so I think that will suffice. I'll stay on the road for the next few years till I get accepted to state. I like the idea of being an esquire, and fighting the law as a criminal attorney. Let's hope I keep it going in the right direction, I'm sick of driving and I need a degree to get me somewere....

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Odd.  When I was in law school and the going got tough, I sometimes would tell the quack that I should have gone to medical school.  lol.gif

I can completely see that.  I can't honestly imagine many people going through law school and NOT thinking that it was some bad decision at at least one point or another.  Probably different points during the three years for different people, but it just seems like it would likely come up.  [If not, the bar exam process should cover that instead.]

To the OP--sounds like you're nailing down some specifics, which is great.  I did a juvenile defense clinic and absolutely loved it.  Not what I'm currently doing, but still great.  All that said--have you ever shadowed a defense attorney (or really any kind of lawyer, but more helpful for it to be someone who does courtroom stuff if that's your interest)?  I'm only asking because I knew a few people who loved law school in order to hate actually doing the legal work/jobs. (Though most were the reverse.)  If you haven't been able to shadow someone just to see what the day-to-day life feels like, it might not hurt to try to figure it out.  Career services might have a connection to someone. 

Only recommending it b/c I know that shadowing a family law attorney was what solidified things for me...I had been wondering what sort of angle to take toward working with kids and families, so I tried a few different ones but when I got to follow him around for a day and ask questions about what sort of things he does, how he handles the job, what he likes and doesn't like, etc., that's really when I settled in on the idea of it being a good fit. 

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Well I haven't shadowed a atourney per say, but I've been threw the lawyer saving my Dumb ass from prison more times than I'd like to admit. I like criminal law because people do stupid shit, and im sure there are plenty of stupid kids out there just like I was, who need not to get their lives ruined over a half oz of weed a cop planted in there car. I have an overwelming overall distaste for any law or person of authority that infringes on the personal rights of an individual, especially so called crimes that arent harmful to others or society. That being said, the passion I have to fight for and uphold the liberties  of all individuals born in and naturalized in america, burns in my belly, to obstruct the enactment of unjust incarnation  of our youth who otherwise may have a shot at really doing something with their lives.

Basically I'm saying I want to fight the laws I hate and get paid for it. 

Plus a law degree is a great thing to shove in the face of the people who said I'd die before I turned 30. HA!

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Well, all I can say is that law school is not for the faint of heart. Most classes are not traditional lectures but more like interrogations (Socratic Method) to see how well you've read the material and understand it and can use it in an argument on your feet. You will not get out of law school without being humiliated at least once. Moreover, the law you learn is really just basic principles rather than the specific laws of any one state. You will come out of law school and likely not even know how to draw up a will much less draw up a complaint for a lawsuit.

Furthermore, if you are at all idealistic, and it sounds like you are, law school will make you cynical. You will learn that constitutional law especially is all political. You can give me the legal issue and who wrote the majority opinion, and I can tell you the result without knowing anything more.

Do I sound a bit bitter?

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I'd suggest jt is realistic rather than bitter, though some schools are moving away from the humiliation approach (still Socratic method but in a more friendly variation).  Mine fortunately was, but I don't know how prevalent it is.

one thing I'll mention only because you referenced it in passing and i don't know the specifics--although arguably it's not right, certain types of past criminal history can in many states prevent you from being licensed.  In addition to the two or three day exam, there's the "character and fitness" portion where they get to analyze every aspect of your life and then say yay or nay.  On one of my states, I went to a second level of review (majority pass it on the first and I think you only have two shots) because of my mental health history, though fortunately the second level went fine and they signed off on it.  Because of the criminal history barrier (again, not suggesting it's right because it does inspire a fair number of people to want to do criminal defense), it likely makes sense to call your states ethics committee/office of bar counsel/office of admissions (they aren't interchangeable but who will answer varies from state to state) and run your background by them as a hypothetical situation and ask for how it could impact admission or if they know definitively it would forbid it or would not forbid it.  Most likely they won't be able to give you a definite, but I think a lot would at least give you a more likely or less likely.  You really don't want to go through the schooling and take out the loans if they're going to say no.  There is in some states what is essentially provisional admission which might be what they ask.

as a quick note, this is regardless of whether your criminal history has been expunged, sealed (as in juvenile records in most states), or otherwise erased.  They will consider the facts most likely, but you are required to disclose everything.

sorry if this comes across as offensive because I really don't mean it that way.

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