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Does anyone else worry about getting dementia as they age?  My maternal grandmother had lewy bodies dementia.  How will they distinguish it from my BP/SZA?

What about all the black box warnings for APs and elderly patients?  I was reading an article today about an elderly woman who had dementia who was prescribed loxapine and it gave her a stroke.  I take loxapine.  I LIKE loxapine.

I feel like I've started this thread before but didn't search so forgive my laziness.  But I worry about the future.  Am 37 now.

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I'm 35 and have the same worries.  I take 7mg of Abilify.  It is my hope that once pot is legalized I can take CBD oil which actually has no THC but has been proven to be very good for your brain.  I also wonder if someday I will be able to take a natural remedy instead of Abilify.  

My grandmother on my mom's side had typical Alzheimers so I worry not only about myself but my mother too.

A good supplement to look into that i just found out about is N Acetyl L Cysteine aka NAC.  I bought a bottle but haven't started it yet.  It might just be a lot of false promises, but it might help with multiple MI's.  I should probably link the source.  Here:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3044191/   It's only speculation so far it seems.  

I recommend taking fish oil of the highest quality and or eating lots of fish too.  At least that is proven to improve neurological function and well as heart health.  It might even help prevent stroke.  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/40253.php

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My Gdoc read a study about benzos and dementia / alzheimers and rushed me off Valium and onto Xanax (The less of two evils)  I'm not clear where the studies are but I've seen some that are just... Awful.  As in - not done with any logic.   There was a study on hormone replacement for women in menopause.  The stopped it because they were concerned that it was giving people heart attacks.  So....   I looked into it

Problem #1.   They didn't study a particular age group.  Such as the ones just entering menopause they gave estrogen to rather old ladies.  Now is this just me or is refueling someones sex drive at age 80 going to increase heart attacks?  Is it least not very scientific to not study the women most likely to want HRT and (I think) least likely to be effected?

Problem #2.  They didn't study any Estrogen that was human.  They can make human identical estrogen but instead use equine hormones.  equine as in horse.  The bit critter people put saddles on and ride around on.  Horse urine... Break apart one of these tablets, take a sniff.  Yuck... Horse pee.   So is there any reason to NOT include human hormones?  At least to see if it had different outcomes.

And now for my paranoid tinfoil hat stuff.  If you take all the studies in the last 5 or 6 years and on the simple basis "Now _________ is determined to be bad for you so don't take/do/whatever this is."   I scratch my head.  I wonder why it seems slanted to the lets not do things (Follow the money!!!)   Welcome to our new healthcare system where terms like "Watchful waiting" are invented as a new non treatment for cancer.   Drugs that were good things and used a lot are now killing us or burning out our brains or other scary stuff. 

Someplace in here are the commercials every 10 minutes for class action suits against drug makers that beg for new people to join.  I'm not sure how that fits in but all of it gives me great concern for where its headed.  Oh and my PDoc is booking appointments (today) for Mid August but they will call me if anyone cancels.  *And GDoc is out 3 or 4 weeks. 

ARGHHHH!!!

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7 hours ago, jarn said:

Does anyone else worry about getting dementia as they age?  My maternal grandmother had lewy bodies dementia.  How will they distinguish it from my BP/SZA?

What about all the black box warnings for APs and elderly patients?  I was reading an article today about an elderly woman who had dementia who was prescribed loxapine and it gave her a stroke.  I take loxapine.  I LIKE loxapine.

I feel like I've started this thread before but didn't search so forgive my laziness.  But I worry about the future.  Am 37 now.

Yes, I do worry about dementia as I get older.  I'm almost 44 right now.

---------

*Disclaimer*  I have not read all these article in full, but have skimmed them.

(In bold) Older people sometimes need a lower dose of certain meds.  The elderly lady who took loxapine and got a stroke, she might have had too much in her system. Here are some links that might be helpful to read about how the elderly sometimes need lower doses of meds.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1873806/

Quote

Distribution

Ageing is accompanied by an increase in body fat, a decrease in lean body mass and a decrease in total body water [4]. Since drug distribution depends largely on body composition these changes result in reduced volume of distribution of water soluble drugs, e.g. digoxin (which may lead to increased initial drug concentration) and increased volume of distribution of lipid soluble drugs, e.g. benzodiazepines (which may lead to increased elimination half-life and prolonged effect). Both types of drug may therefore require reduction in dose and/or dose interval.

 

Here is another one:

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/drug-prescribing-for-older-adults

Quote

Dose availability — Older individuals often require lower than usual doses of medications, especially at initiation. If medications are not readily available in prescribed doses, the need to split tablets may make it more difficult for patients to take beneficial drug therapy [75].

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http://www.netwellness.org/healthtopics/aging/faq16.cfm

Quote

Special Considerations: Drugs Affecting the Central Nervous System

Psychoactive drugs have an effect on the brain and are among the most frequent medications given to the elderly. Elderly patients generally require lower doses of psychoactive drugs, in some cases one-fourth to one-half the dose of a younger patient.

I hope some of this helps.

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 I'm terrified.  Honestly and truly terrified.  As in, now that I think about it, I probably should bring it up with my therapist because I'm not sure this level of fear falls into the okay range.

I'm not sure if that helps though.  My fears stem from the fact that my mom's mom had dementia coupled with depression and my mom's dad had Alzheimer's.  I don't know whose was worse because with my grandmother, she was truly and utterly miserable for a good three or four years.  But my grandfather remembered just enough to know he's already asked something but not enough to remember the answer, so he'd ask a question twenty times and every single time preface it with "I know I asked this and I'm sorry, but (where are we going or something similar)?"  He was one of the kindest and gentlest people on the planet, but the remembering enough to know he's not remembering really got to him.  And yet strangely didn't make it worse so that he stopped remembering.  [His last words to me were actually "remember, it's all about love" - which while it might seem generic, doesn't feel that way because of his sixty year love with my grandmother.]  But I don't get the brain sometimes.  I'm trying to remain hopeful about the fact both of my dad's parents were lucid until their death and hit fairly normal age-related health issues.  Hopefully those genes will kick in.  Or my crossword puzzles will pay off. 

On the more practical and less anxiety-involved side of things--as far as distinguishing between neurological and psychiatric as you get older--my understanding is that there are geriatric psychiatrists who really know what they're doing with respect to the elderly population.  I'm sure like any other field, there's a full range of competency...but if it gets to the point where it's messy, there are people you can turn to for suggestions, advice, and treatment.  Kind of like the reverse of child psychiatrists.  And also a lot of geriatric specialists generally (PCPs focused on the elderly) are quite good.  So I'm crossing my fingers that as I continue to grow older, people continue to be willing to practice in these fields and to do it well.  That's about my main consolation, other than hoping that I take after my dad's genes. 

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My grandfather had Alzheimer's, and it is one horrible disease. I watched him suffer and go down hill for 2-3 years before he died. There is not much more painful than when a loved one no longer recognizes you or knows your name. In the end he was so depressed and lost like, and I couldn't even get through to him that he was home. He couldn't even talk at the end and just constantly moaned the words "Oh no". It was a nightmare.

But I don't lie awake thinking of getting dementia. There's nothing I can do and there's no cure. So it does no good and serves no purpose to worry about something like that.

 

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That's a valid point.  It's not like I obsess over it or it intruded into my thought patterns.  But it is one where if explicitly raised (frequently by my mom), I recognize how terrified I am.  So I don't know if that's really a clinical thing or not. I try to buy the there's no way to know argument, but it's hard sometimes.

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I'm kind of been a magnet for health issues and I don't know if this will help but when I had heart problems mine was caught before things got damaged (Like REALLY close) so I came out of surgery able to walk around and other then missing lots of leg veins and having some monster scars I was lucky.  One of the wheel chair guys kept trying to get me to ride around in his wheel chair and I declined.  Together we picked up the next person who had trouble doing anything.  So.... I didn't feel too bad.   Then it was cancer but mine was caught so that they surgeons could hack it out.   Again - lucky.  I could look at the half empty glass and talk about some of the baggage that came with that but...  My sister has some muscle disease and will get weaker  and weaker. 

Someone always has it worse and like the DBT stuff.  Focusing on your own problems and not being able to keep it out of your mind just echos back and forth until you make yourself sick.

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Well considering the old name of schizophrenia is dementia praecox it's understandable to be a little anxious about it (well I am) but I don't think the name had anything to do with actual dementia which is why it got changed to schizophrenia years later. I don't know I could be wrong. I'm just waffling on...

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On 6/17/2016 at 2:43 AM, HAL9000 said:

Someone always has it worse and like the DBT stuff.  Focusing on your own problems and not being able to keep it out of your mind just echos back and forth until you make yourself sick.

I agree with this.  Focusing on others problems really helps sometimes so your head can get a rest from thinking about your own problems.

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4 hours ago, melissaw72 said:

I agree with this.  Focusing on others problems really helps sometimes so your head can get a rest from thinking about your own problems.

This is why I like horror movies, particularly of the killer run amok variety. After watching such mayhem for 2 hours, you come out of the theater and think, "Maybe my life isn't so bad."  It really helps me to take my mind off my problems for a while.

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On 6/22/2016 at 11:32 AM, jt07 said:

This is why I like horror movies, particularly of the killer run amok variety. After watching such mayhem for 2 hours, you come out of the theater and think, "Maybe my life isn't so bad."  It really helps me to take my mind off my problems for a while.

Now THAT made me laugh.....In a good way, of course.

Now that I'm 56 and have been on these/miscellaneous meds since I was 30, I worry about dementia all the time.  Sometimes I don't "get" things, whicthmakes me worry.  I catch my husband just looking at me and shaking his head....NOT happy about that either. 

I have a huge problem expressing myself verbally...would it get better if I lowered my dosage on any said drug?  Who knows....

I'm a huge crossword player and still do it on a daily basis.... let's hope there's some credence to that.

 

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