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I WANT to quit my job and can't!


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My job consists of answering the phone supporting products my company sells. These products are medical devices and the callers are stressed-out clinicians, so I handle the bulk of their stress and also feel the urgency of fixing stuff asap for them.

I want to quit my job but wouldn't get unemp if I did, and need the insurance.

They denied me reasonable accomidations already.

My pdoc's plan is that I need to work and work, until I get reprimanded in writing, then take that to her and she will write a formal letter to HR asking for accomidations. If I get none then I get none. Otherwise, this is more proof in the pudding to file SSDI .

Is there a way to quit my job and have money coming in, or would I be penniless until the SSDI came, if they even approve it?!

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You could quit your job and apply for state disability insurance.  The requirements for this are much easier than SSDI.  You just need one doctor to diagnosis your condition and certify that your condition renders you incapable of performing your last job.  You can collect this for up to one year.  Usually the pay is 2/3 of what your earnings is during your last quarter.  You would go to your unemployment office and apply for this.  In the meantime, you should simultaneously apply for SSDI (if you condition does, in fact, render you incapable of working ANY full-time job in the nation's economy (including wire bender, filing papers, doll stuffer, planting seedlings, watering plants, parking lot attendant, greeter at Wal-Mart).

Word of warning:  Do not collect or apply for UNEMPLOYMENT insurance benefits while pursuing a claim for SSDI and/or SSI, as this shows that you are ready, willing, and able to work.

Does your pdoc know the formal requirements for the letter for your disability.  The letter must state that your disability is a mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities.  Examples of major life activities including working, thinking, concentrating, interacting with others, caring for self.  "Substantially limiting" means when compared to the general population.  The letter should mention which life activity or activities are impaired and to what extent the activities/y is/are impaired when compared to the general population.  The letter should also include how your condition affects your job (e.g. fluctuations in stamina, side effects of medication, attendance, interacting with others, productivity standards, concentration) and the letter should mention which accommodations would be appropriate. For examples of suggested accommodations, I do suggest that you check out the Job Accommodation Network:

http://www.jan.wvu.edu/soar/psych.html

and especially

http://www.jan.wvu.edu/media/Psychiatric.html

Also, if you have trouble with your current job, you might want to check out the state-run Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), the office of vocational rehabilitation (voc rehab).  This organization provides free services to help people with disabilities obtain and secure employement.  Look them up in the front white government section (state offices, I believe) of your local phone directory).

I hope some of this information is of help to you.

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Wait, let's talk about the reasonable accommodation aspect before we start talking SSDI.  I know people think that getting on benefits is going to be the savior but often times it's not.  Yes, SSDI allows you to keep your assets but still... I know many people complaining that they can't get the things they need because they are on benefits.  I know it's a solution - but let's try accommodations first.

Work gives us purpose.  Work associates us with people and allows us to be part of a community.  It's hard, especially when I want to crawl into a hole, but I know the hole would be worse in the long run.

Reasonable accommodation is a process.  Not a yes or no question.  You need to go to JAN and ask how a reasonable accommodation process should work.  Go to JAN spell out what your problem is and what the barriers are and they will help find a solution.  If you go to your supervisor (or if you have an HR person - you can go there too) with a list of suggestions from JAN - then they have a starting place to make accommodation for you.

If this doesn't work, go to your Disability Law Center or EEOC office to file a complaint.

Reasonable accommodation can't be denied unless it causes an undue hardship (i.e. your accommodation cost an extreme amount and your company is small  OR if it would have an impact on the entire staff OR it would change the nature of the business) or posed a threat.

Also, go to your Mental Health Board.  Ask them for support too.  See what they suggest. 

As a P>S.  My state doesn't offer the protection that Bryan talked about.  If you apply for SSDI or SSI you will get a $260 check every month until your claim is denied or accepted.

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As a P>S.  My state doesn't offer the protection that Bryan talked about.  If you apply for SSDI or SSI you will get a $260 check every month until your claim is denied or accepted.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I am not being nasty but I do not know of anyone ever getting any money while waiting for a decision. I applied for SSI and did nto receive any money at all until my case was decided. Is this true for your state? Really, I have never, ever heard of this.

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Heya Libby,

I know **nothing** about social insurance in the US.

I just want to say, your job sounds like it *sucks.*

Dealing with us annoyed docs/med techs must, as they say, drive you nuts (for me, anyway, a short ride).

--ncc--

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In my state, there is temporary disability insurance that a doctor or nurse practictioner or psychologist can prescribe for temporary disability (for disability that lasts for 8 days to one year).  This is in California.  The doctor or health professional fills out a form stating why you cannot perform your last job. One can pick up the form at the local unemployment office.  This is called State Disability Insurance (SDI).  Once can get this for up to a year.

Apparently this is not available in all states.  It is designed for temporary disabilities that  cause people to take a break from their usual jobs (e.g. surgeries, broken bones, pregnancies) but could be used in the interim while applying for SSDI/SSI.

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As a P>S.  My state doesn't offer the protection that Bryan talked about.  If you apply for SSDI or SSI you will get a $260 check every month until your claim is denied or accepted.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I am not being nasty but I do not know of anyone ever getting any money while waiting for a decision. I applied for SSI and did nto receive any money at all until my case was decided. Is this true for your state? Really, I have never, ever heard of this.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I think it depends completely on the state you live in. When I applied, I also applied for state services. (Cash and Medical) I had to go to a psychologist to be evaluated, and when I was approved, I was granted $339 a month cash, $152 a month in food stamps, and medical and prescription coverage. I had to be re-evaluated after 6 months the first time, and then yearly after that. When my SSDI was finally approved, the state took the cash portion that they'd paid me out of my back benefit check. The food stamp and medical benefits did not have to be reimbursed.

I thought the interesting part was how I was determined to be disabled 3 times by the state, but it took an application, reconsideration, and ALJ hearing for SSA to determine the same thing. Jerks.

I live in Washington BTW.

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I ended up getting canned this week, so now I'm going to get my unemp, and my pdoc is very enthused about applying for SSDI. I live in Ohio, where everything sucks, so I'll only get my unemp for so long and then SSDI had better kick in!

Thanks for sharing SerraGeorge. I've missed hearing from you. I like the pic of you and the kitty- I love my kitties too. I should post their pics.

-----melinda the loon--------

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I ended up getting canned this week, so now I'm going to get my unemp, and my pdoc is very enthused about applying for SSDI. I live in Ohio, where everything sucks, so I'll only get my unemp for so long and then SSDI had better kick in!

Thanks for sharing SerraGeorge. I've missed hearing from you. I like the pic of you and the kitty- I love my kitties too. I should post their pics.

-----melinda the loon--------

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

You sound enthused about being let go. How long had you worked there? How did they let you go?

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How can anyone survive off of $339 a month

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Well, this anyone happens to live in an apartment that her mother owns. I get a serious break on rent and utilities. I feel so very fortunate to have such a strong support system. There are other social services you can get into... there's a phone program which will get you a phone in your house for something like $12 a month... I think there's an electricity one too. There are housing programs, but I have a daughter, so I need two bedrooms... those are tougher to come by, and the waiting lists tend to be daunting.

But yeah... I feel you on that. I'd have given up on the SSDI thing long ago and stumbled through yet another job, if not for my parents. In fact, that was my pattern for several years. Work at a job until the stress and my bipolar got to me, quit or get fired and be poor for a couple months, qualify for state medical, get meds and get better, go back to work and lose my medical coverage, work until I went crazy again.

It's sure not for the faint of heart!

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