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Has anyone tried GABA?  I've heard good things and bad things about it from what I have researched.

Was wondering if anyone has tried it, and if so how it was for you. 

Good/bad experiences both are welcome.

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I take it every night and it helps to 'relax  and open' my mind. If I am irritable or having inside voices that don't allow me to think it helps a lot.

I take it with glycine and a multivitamin, glycine and gaba is a good combination with vitamin B6.

It is considered gaba can't enter the brain because of the blood brain barrier, it does as glutamate, and there it's transformed into gaba again using vitamin B6 as a cofactor. But some people think it actually can cross the BBB.

 

Edited by Bixo
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Thanks, Bixo.  I got some and am thinking about taking it, but want to bring it up with pdoc first.  Didn't have time today, so maybe next week.  He might not say yes for right now though because I just went off abilify, and he doesnt want to make too many changes at the same time.

I would still like to hear more about it, more comments welcome.

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15 hours ago, crtclms said:

This was a few years ago, but at least a couple of people here became manic when they combined GABA and 5-HTP.  So run it past your pdoc.

Thanks, I plan on telling pdoc.  I just have to wait until we have more time to discuss it at an appt.  I appreciate your input.

 

15 hours ago, toast said:

If you want to try a GABA supplement, then try picamilon. It is basically a GABA molecule which is bonded to a niacin molecule. This allows it to cross the blood-brain barrier. It was developed in Russia and is available OTC here in the US.

Interesting.  Thanks ... I'll have to look it up.  I've never heard of the term 'picamilon' ... do you know of the OTC name of it?  I did read about taking it with B6. 

What would happen if a med/supplement, in general, didn't cross the blood brain barrier (BBB).  When I was reading about it, that was what confused me a little.  Why does 'everyone' (in general, in everything I've read about it so far, at least) bring that up specifically, that is doesn't cross the BBB? (asking about GABA, specifically)

Edited by melissaw72
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3 hours ago, melissaw72 said:

 

What would happen if a med/supplement, in general, didn't cross the blood brain barrier (BBB).  When I was reading about it, that was what confused me a little.  Why does 'everyone' (in general, in everything I've read about it so far, at least) bring that up specifically, that is doesn't cross the BBB? (asking about GABA, specifically)

Meds that are active in the CNS generally have to be able to pass through the BBB, if a med can't pass this safety net that keeps toxins out of the CNS this med will not be active in the CNS. People mention GABA's inability to pass the BBB because it is true.

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3 minutes ago, notloki said:

Meds that are active in the CNS generally have to be able to pass through the BBB, if a med can't pass this safety net that keeps toxins out of the CNS this med will not be active in the CNS. People mention GABA's inability to pass the BBB because it is true.

Thanks for answering ... I did know GABA didn't cross the BBB, but why is it such a big deal with the GABA not passing through it ... why is that so bad for something to not cross the BBB though ... what would it mean for me if it doesn't cross it?  I know it won't go through the CNS, so does that mean it is keeping something in my body that could hurt me or ???

What are the negative reasons for something not crossing the BBB?  I understand it won't affect my CNS, but why would that matter?

Sorry for all the questions, but I am so confused and I think I am trying to ask a question that I can't figure out, so all the little questions are filling my head instead.

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The BBB sits between the CNS and your blood supply and keeps toxins out of the CNS. Psychotropic drugs need to get to the CNS, that is where they do their work, ie they are active. GABA is one such drug, if it cannot pass the BBB it can't get to the sites where it works.

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1 minute ago, notloki said:

The BBB sits between the CNS and your blood supply and keeps toxins out of the CNS. Psychotropic drugs need to get to the CNS, that is where they do their work, ie they are active. GABA is one such drug, if it cannot pass the BBB it can't get to the sites where it works.

So is there any point in taking it, if it can't get to the sites where it works?

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Well, It seems is not necessary true it doesn't cross it... and even if it doesn't it could have an indirect effect on CNS. It's not proved, but It could be...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4594160/

'....

There are both a number of studies that were unable to show that GABA crosses the BBB and a number of studies that did show GABA’s ability to cross. In view of the multitude of employed methods and species, in addition to the finding that GABA metabolism might differ between rodents and humans (Errante et al., 2002), it is not possible at this time to come to a definite conclusion with regards to GABA’s BBB permeability in humans.

....

Furthermore, we discussed GABA’s role as a food supplement and the way in which these products might exert an effect other than through BBB permeation. There is some evidence for the claims made by hundreds of consumers online concerning the calming effects of GABA food supplements, but evidence from independent studies is needed. In addition, even if a calming effect of GABA can be reliably demonstrated, the mechanism through which these supplements work is unclear. We have suggested that GABA supplements might work through the ENS, but far more research is needed in order to support this hypothesis. Indeed, at this point it is even too early to conclude whether these supplements reach the brain in sufficient concentrations to exert a biologically relevant effect.'

 

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26227783

Edited by Bixo
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8 minutes ago, notloki said:

I don't find consumer reports compelling. Anyway GABA has a half life of 17 MINUTES, making direct use of it impractical.  

Not necessary for everything. If it goes to your brain even if later it becomes glutamate, it can be transformed again into gaba. It doesn't just disappear, it may also end up inside cells to be used later. It's just unknown exactly how it works.

Edited by Bixo
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5 hours ago, Bixo said:

Well, It seems is not necessary true it doesn't cross it... and even if it doesn't it could have an indirect effect on CNS. It's not proved, but It could be...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4594160/

'....

There are both a number of studies that were unable to show that GABA crosses the BBB and a number of studies that did show GABA’s ability to cross. In view of the multitude of employed methods and species, in addition to the finding that GABA metabolism might differ between rodents and humans (Errante et al., 2002), it is not possible at this time to come to a definite conclusion with regards to GABA’s BBB permeability in humans.

....

Furthermore, we discussed GABA’s role as a food supplement and the way in which these products might exert an effect other than through BBB permeation. There is some evidence for the claims made by hundreds of consumers online concerning the calming effects of GABA food supplements, but evidence from independent studies is needed. In addition, even if a calming effect of GABA can be reliably demonstrated, the mechanism through which these supplements work is unclear. We have suggested that GABA supplements might work through the ENS, but far more research is needed in order to support this hypothesis. Indeed, at this point it is even too early to conclude whether these supplements reach the brain in sufficient concentrations to exert a biologically relevant effect.'

 

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26227783

Thank you for the information.  I hadn't heard of this possibility before. 

Before I take the GABA though, I'll ask pdoc about it.  He might know more about how it will work with my meds (if at all).

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