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Soooooo, I'm "interviewing" a couple of new tdocs to go to regularly. This woman I just met (whom I had a good rapport with) mentioned she often does "psychoanalysis" type therapy (it's not the only therapy she does however)....she has a couch you can lay on & everything.

I have the impression that Psychoanalysis is an "old school" type therapy, that focuses on abstract intellectual process/childhood blathering compared to more tangible day-to-day skills therapy or structured method of improving symptom management. Just to note: i have done a ton of CBT (not helpful at all), DBT groups & individual (helpful, but no therapists here do this type) and a few others like A.C.T. These are more structured...

Curious if anyone has gone to a Psychoanalyst and found it helpful (specifically for chronic depression and negative thought patterns)

Edited by cloudmonger
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Psychoanalysis can be effective for persistent depressive symptoms, particularly those where there is a big psychosocial underlay. It focuses on looking at interpersonal patterns and personality factors in the context of how they come up in the therapeutic relationship.  So yes, it does look at the past, but it's interested in how the past informs and plays out in the present with the goal of improving relationships and functioning in the present. 

The disadvantage is that it is a long term therapy and improvements may take some time (it usually lasts years). So it makes sense to try a shorter term, more structured therapy first. If you have and it hasn't worked, it makes sense to try a longer term, more expressive therapy. 

Personally I do psychodynamic psychotherapy which comes from similar principles to analysis but is done face to face without the couch. I like it and I think it goes deeper and goes into the real issues behind my "stuff" better than the short term therapies did. 

That said I'm glad that I did some DBT informed therapy first to help me get a handle on my day to day life and make that piece tolerable. 

I would just make sure this therapist has actual analytic training because it's the kind of therapy that can go quite badly wrong if the therapist isn't qualified and is just messing around in there. 

Edited by tryp
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2 hours ago, tryp said:

Psychoanalysis can be effective for persistent depressive symptoms, particularly those where there is a big psychosocial underlay. It focuses on looking at interpersonal patterns and personality factors in the context of how they come up in the therapeutic relationship.  So yes, it does look at the past, but it's interested in how the past informs and plays out in the present with the goal of improving relationships and functioning in the present. 

The disadvantage is that it is a long term therapy and improvements may take some time (it usually lasts years). So it makes sense to try a shorter term, more structured therapy first. If you have and it hasn't worked, it makes sense to try a longer term, more expressive therapy. 

Personally I do psychodynamic psychotherapy which comes from similar principles to analysis but is done face to face without the couch. I like it and I think it goes deeper and goes into the real issues behind my "stuff" better than the short term therapies did. 

That said I'm glad that I did some DBT informed therapy first to help me get a handle on my day to day life and make that piece tolerable. 

I would just make sure this therapist has actual analytic training because it's the kind of therapy that can go quite badly wrong if the therapist isn't qualified and is just messing around in there. 

Thank you both (btw still not sure here how to quote 2 people in same reply). This is very helpful. I read in the above link "Talking with a trained psychoanalyst helps identify underlying problematic patterns and behaviors. By analyzing the transference and countertransference, analyst and patient, can discover paths toward the emotional freedom necessary to make substantive, lasting changes, and heal from past traumas."

Yeah, my concern is that it could take YEARS to really make solid strides. Maybe it will be a good thing to try to get some deeper insight as to why I'm still suffering from the same thought patterns & issues with an inability to move forward... despite YEARS of meds and talk therapy...hopefully she will be able to make sessions dynamic & interactive as well. I do often like having "homework" to do. I always feel uncomfortable when the therapists just asks questions about history and whatnot and then they don't really have much to say in reply (or they just cop-out and asks you for the solution) For example: Well if you had a friend in xyz situation, what would you tell him or her?"

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3 hours ago, cloudmonger said:

btw still not sure here how to quote 2 people in same reply

When you want to quote a 2nd person, click on 'quote' of the post you want to quote.  Then both quotes will be in the same post.    ie, I will quote someone, write whatever, then if I want to quote a 2nd person, I hit the 'quote' of the other post you want in your post.

 

3 hours ago, cloudmonger said:

For example: Well if you had a friend in xyz situation, what would you tell him or her?"

I hate when that happens.  It is a cop-out ... If you knew that answer you would be able to solve the problem yourself! 

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