Jump to content
CrazyBoards.org

where do you feel a migraine?


Recommended Posts

 

I had gone close to a year without a migraine...I was really lucky.  as my stress level has increased, they have come back.  I know stress doesn't cause them, but it sure doesn't help them for me.  Because after none for about  a year, I've now had two in a two week period.  The first one I'm quite sure because it was (ironically) on the way to my neurologist and he declared it one when I mentioned the nausea and light sensitivity, which makes sense.  I'm currently on number two, I think.  I woke up with it at around 4:00am, which has happened to me before--almost a pattern (http://www.crazyboards.org/forums/index.php?/topic/81828-migraine-upon-waking/.  And I'm nauseous.  I know that wouldn't be enough to make a diagnosis, but it's enough of my warning signs to warrant an imitrex. 

What I'm wondering...how do you classify the location of migraine and the type?  I'm so out of practice that I don't know how to spot one that way.  If I didn't have the nausea (thank you zofran), I wouldn't be as sure. 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My neurologist calls mine classic migraines. They are typically on the left side of my face, with particular focus behind my eye.  I'd say about 99% of the time I see an aura first (zigzaggy flashing lights), which is my cue to take Maxalt and an antiemetic (depending on how quickly I catch them, I may add painkillers, caffeine and ice). 

I've also experienced migraines without the headache, which for me involve seeing the aura, then going partially blind for a period. If this happens at work I just have to sit at my desk and not move until it passes.

 

Edited by MiaB
clarity
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, dancesintherain said:

 

I had gone close to a year without a migraine...I was really lucky.  as my stress level has increased, they have come back.  I know stress doesn't cause them, but it sure doesn't help them for me.  Because after none for about  a year, I've now had two in a two week period.  The first one I'm quite sure because it was (ironically) on the way to my neurologist and he declared it one when I mentioned the nausea and light sensitivity, which makes sense.  I'm currently on number two, I think.  I woke up with it at around 4:00am, which has happened to me before--almost a pattern (http://www.crazyboards.org/forums/index.php?/topic/81828-migraine-upon-waking/.  And I'm nauseous.  I know that wouldn't be enough to make a diagnosis, but it's enough of my warning signs to warrant an imitrex. 

What I'm wondering...how do you classify the location of migraine and the type?  I'm so out of practice that I don't know how to spot one that way.  If I didn't have the nausea (thank you zofran), I wouldn't be as sure. 

 

 

Mine usually start with a bad tension headache with the nausea (zofran), that nothing will relieve that pain, including ice packs.  I also get very irritable.  Need to be in the dark with no noise.

What might bring them on is extra constant stress, lots of noise (lots of stimulation), and a lot of lack of sleep.

I am not sure about how to classify which kind they are until they actually happen. They are usually on my left side though.

If I am sleeping they will wake me up. 

Like @MiaB , I also experience migraines without pain, but I don't lose vision and do not have an aura (that I know of).  They happen "quietly" ... sometimes I think it is just the usual stress and being irritable.  And they are hard for me to catch right when they start.

All light (including computer screens) makes the migraines worse for me.  I need the dark and no noise.  However as the migraine lessens I can slowly start to tolerate the light.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Ugh, headache-less migraines suck in their own special way. Those are actually more likely to put me to bed than regular migraines. But at this point, after 5 or 6 years of almost daily headaches, I can often stay upright for the headaches, and even eat. I can surf with sunglasses on. I can't *do* anything, though.

Most of my headaches are over my left eye, and by most, I mean maybe 55% of the time. They are by far the most common ones of all the types. I also get the fake sinus type; what makes those tricky is that there is such a thing as a sinus headache. But for me, the quality of the pain is really obvious (I only use the highest quality pain!). Real sinus is more of a dull, heavy pain. The worst headaches generalize into its feeling like the top of my head is about to blow off. I get crazy painful stiff necks, which they've finally accepted as a symptom of migraine. I've had two basilar migraines, one where I became very clumsy, broke several things, and saw double, as in two items, separate and whole. I've never had that experience before or since. You might want to look that type up, they're rarer, but you should know about them.

I also get headaches along my upper jaw line, radiating into my nose, and I know that is not uncommon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Has anyone tried these:

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B000USRG90/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

I just bought these a couple weeks ago.  They block out blue light, and when I wear them, I either avoid a headache, or lessen it.  They don't work for me during the day as much because I still get migraines.  But at night they really help.  They were inexpensive also.

 

https://www.migrainekey.com/blog/why-blue-light-triggers-migraines/

Quote

Blue light causes oxidative stress and high levels of oxidative stress are associated with migraines

Quote

Fluorescents, LEDs, TVs, computers, smart phones, and other electronics that emit blue light disrupt our sleep patterns at night. Additionally, these devices do not provide a constant source of light. They are actually flickering. This flickering from artificial lights has been reported to trigger migraines and is well known for causing eye strain and headaches (study 1, 2). The combination of eye strain, oxidative stress, and sleep disruptions make blue light dangerous for migraine sufferers.

--------------

http://www.webmd.com/migraines-headaches/news/20160517/giving-the-green-light-to-migraine-relief

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My migraines feel like someone is pushing a sharp pointy object into my left eye. I also get nauseous. Darkness makes a noticeable difference. Computer screens always make it worse.

I haven't had a full-on migraine since I was in college (6+ years ago). I've never had them bad/often enough to bring up with my GP. Usually what I've done is take a Dramamine and an excedrine migraine and then try to sleep it off.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Geek said:

My migraines feel like someone is pushing a sharp pointy object into my left eye. I also get nauseous. Darkness makes a noticeable difference. Computer screens always make it worse.

I haven't had a full-on migraine since I was in college (6+ years ago). I've never had them bad/often enough to bring up with my GP. Usually what I've done is take a Dramamine and an excedrine migraine and then try to sleep it off.

That's my experience as well, although I mostly get tension headaches rather than migraines, which can be just as ghastly in their own way. When extreme allergies, nausea, headaches, and MI (esp. mixed) all meld together, it's a fucking nightmare.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...