Jump to content
CrazyBoards.org

Recommended Posts

Hi,

My doctor prescribed 200mg Seroquel (regular, not XR) every day. It is mainly for my insomnia and anxiety.

I have a family history of diabetes, so I am very concerned about this medicine. We already tried Remeron, Neurotonin etc. but they didn't work well. 

What doses of Seroquel have higher chances of causing diabetes? Is 200mg high-risk dose?

Also, the Seroquel website suggests taking Seroquel on empty stomach or with a meal fewer than 300 calories. Why is that? What happens if Seroquel is taken with a high-calorie meal? Does it spike blood sugar levels?

Thank you in advance.

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From the PI:

Quote

A high-fat meal (approximately 800 to 1000 calories) was found to produce statistically significant increases in the SEROQUEL XR Cmax and AUC of 44% to 52% and 20% to 22%, respectively, for the 50 mg and 300 mg tablets. In comparison, a light meal (approximately 300 calories) had no significant effect on the Cmax or AUC of quetiapine. It is recommended that SEROQUEL XR be taken without food or with a light meal

Basically you get a significant dose increase if taken with a large meal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

44 minutes ago, notloki said:

From the PI:

Basically you get a significant dose increase if taken with a large meal.

 

Thank you for your response. Does this also apply to regular Seroquel (not XR)?

42 minutes ago, Iceberg said:

Almost any antipsychotic can cause metabolic issues

Thank you. But is the casual relationship between Seroquel and diabetes proven?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2/24/2017 at 3:58 PM, Iceberg said:

Well it's a black box warning I think 

Actually it is in the warnings section the black box is for increased death in the elderly and generally increased suicidal behavior.

The warnings section of the PI:

Quote

 Metabolic Changes: Atypical antipsychotics have been associated with metabolic changes. These metabolic changes include hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and weight gain (5.5)  Hyperglycemia and Diabetes Mellitus: Monitor patients for symptoms of hyperglycemia including polydipsia, polyuria, polyphagia, and weakness. Monitor glucose regularly in patients with diabetes or at risk for diabetes  Dyslipidemia: Undesirable alterations have been observed in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics. Appropriate clinical monitoring is recommended, including fasting blood lipid testing at the beginning of, and periodically, during treatment  Weight Gain: Gain in body weight has been observed; clinical monitoring of weight is recommended

But no direct link to causing diabetes.

hyperglycemia is high blood sugar, dyslipidemia is abnormal lipids (LDL, HDL, triglycerides), polydipsia is thirst, polyuria is peeing a lot, and polyphagia is increased hunger

Edited by notloki
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fasting Glucose more measures insulin resistance, A1C tells you what the average glucose level was over the last 3 months and is a much better tool for diagnosing diabetes. 

I think that section of the PI tries very hard not to say "it causes Diabetes".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you all for the responses.

If I take extra care with my diet (avoiding fats, sugar, eating a healthy diet), does it minimize the chances of diabetes even if I am on Seroquel?

Also, there is a suggestion about taking Seroquel XR with a meal less than 300 calories. Does this also apply to regular Seroquel? I could not find any information regarding regular Seroquel. 

 

Edited by svr
Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, Iceberg said:

On the full PI from the FDA there is a section that specifically mentions diabetes 

But did you see this part:

Quote

Assessment of the relationship between atypical antipsychotic use and glucose abnormalities is complicated by the possibility of an increased background risk of diabetes mellitus in patients with schizophrenia and the increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus in the general population. Given these confounders, the relationship between atypical antipsychotic use and hyperglycemia-related adverse reactions is not completely understood.

 

Diabetes is about damage to cells in the pancreas, high sugars a just a symptom of this.

High blood sugar can have many causes separate from diabetes as can hypertension and dyslipidemia. 

 

Edited by notloki
Link to comment
Share on other sites

53 minutes ago, .id said:

There is a link to diabetes, I am on 600mg XR, it is up to your doctor to make sure you are tested but I do say this is rare, I had a lot of sugar craving so that is a factor to think about

Diabetes is not about craving sugar. Type II Means your body is insulin resistant and this is the cause of high blood sugar, not sugar intake. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...