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Which anticonvulsant is most similar


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Guest ~Aurelie~

Since clonazepam is an anticonvulsant as well as an antianxiety med, I'm wondering if there is an anticonvulsant on the market that works the same way in the brain? For some reason i'm thinking Neurontin? Anyone know?

thanks

aurelie

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Sorry, my mind isn't making sense tonight.  I'll try to correct my error and either let someone else answer or try again tommorrow.

Klonopin is a Benzodiazepine, similar to Xanax and others.

So again, it isnt an anticonvulsant, and can't be compared directly.

I do think you are on the right track to tackle the underlying condition with a drug that can work long term. The benzos are a temporary patch, and they tend to lose effectiveness with use.

A.M.

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Klonopin is a Benzodiazepine, similar to Xanax and others.

So again, it isnt an anticonvulsant, and can't be compared directly.

well, no.  klonopin is actually a strong anticonvulsant.  great in an emergency.

you know, like on house md, someone seizes and they scream "push 2 ccs of ativan!"

but you are right that it is hard to compare the method of action between a benzo and another anti convulsant.  they all work in different ways (and some say they just don't know how they work hem)

people do sub neurontin for benzos for anxiety with mixed results depending on the person. 

penny

edited to add that i'm attempting to sub lyrica for xanax xl but don't know yet if it's working... but the EU accepted lyrica as a treatmetn for general anxiety.  the fda rejected it for anxiety, it's approved here for neuropathic pain and seizures.

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Since clonazepam is an anticonvulsant as well as an antianxiety med, I'm wondering if there is an anticonvulsant on the market that works the same way in the brain? For some reason i'm thinking Neurontin? Anyone know?

thanks

aurelie

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

It really depends what you're trying to treat and how.

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Hi:

Klonopin, or clonazepam, is both a benzodiazepine and an anticonvulsant, as stated in the PI sheet, and is approved for treatment for a variety of seizure disorders.

But I have no clue with regard to your initial query. Sorry.

Todd.

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Klonopin, or clonazepam, is both a benzodiazepine and an anticonvulsant, as stated in the PI sheet, and is approved for treatment for a variety of seizure disorders.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Yeah.  There are a few of the benzos that make pretty good ACs.  Unfortunately, that doesn't mean that other ACs can be used in place of everything those benzos are used for, because the benzos also do other things.

(not meant to imply you thought that, just clearing that up for anyone else who may not know)

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Guest ~Aurelie~

Since clonazepam is an anticonvulsant as well as an antianxiety med, I'm wondering if there is an anticonvulsant on the market that works the same way in the brain? For some reason i'm thinking Neurontin? Anyone know?

thanks

aurelie

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

It really depends what you're trying to treat and how.

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Johnny 5 thanks for letting me know about Lyrica. I didn't know they came out with a new version of Neurontin. I will look it up. do you know if it is the same but for a better side effect profile? i am looking for something antianxiety and for wierd seizure-like episodes that i think have more to do with dissociation and flashbacks than actual seizures. then again i don't know for certain.

thanks!

aurelie

i think it pretty much has the same side effect profile.

if i was going to be cynical, i would point out that neurontin is about to go generic and at the same time they are releasing the new better neurontin...

but um, neuronting didn't work on me... so i'm now trying lyrica out.  taking it for a test drive for anxiety.  it's only been two weeks though so i'm still on a baby dose and don't know if it's working.

hereis the press release from pfuzer about lyrica's approval for GAD in the EU.  and i made a post here with two studies of lyrica on anxiety.

good luck with this.

penny

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i think it pretty much has the same side effect profile.

if i was going to be cynical, i would point out that neurontin is about to go generic and at the same time they are releasing the new better neurontin...

but um, neuronting didn't work on me... so i'm now trying lyrica out.  taking it for a test drive for anxiety.  it's only been two weeks though so i'm still on a baby dose and don't know if it's working.

hereis the press release from pfuzer about lyrica's approval for GAD in the EU.  and i made a post here with two studies of lyrica on anxiety.

good luck with this.

penny

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Just FYI, as the local Aspie factoid-man, Neurontin has been generic for nearly two years now (right as the patent seemed destined for imminent failure), Parke-Davis... I mean, Pfizer, came up with new, related 'prodrugs'/GABA agonists.  Only know this since I've been taking the stuff for about 4 years now, and around 2004, my pills suddenly changed color and were roughly 3/4ths as expensive (a small discount for generics, as they go).

In fact, 'herrfous' is a nickname I was given during the summer of 2004.  It's an amalgam of 'herr', meaning that I knew way too much German (heck I'm about fluent in it, or at least my resume says so), and 'FOUS', an acronym meaning "Full Of Useless Shit".  During a roadtrip with co-workers from my then-home in San Jose to Yosemite National Park, 4 hours away, I was called 'Factoid Man' by a coworker/friend for spewing out so many Aspie-inspired facts.  I corrected him, telling him that I was more 'full of useless shit' than I was a 'factoid man'.  The name was acronymized and sort of stuck for the next year or so.  Meh, I don't mind, worse has happened in the meantime. :);)

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Guest ~Aurelie~

Johnny 5 thanks for letting me know about Lyrica. I didn't know they came out with a new version of Neurontin. I will look it up. do you know if it is the same but for a better side effect profile? i am looking for something antianxiety and for wierd seizure-like episodes that i think have more to do with dissociation and flashbacks than actual seizures. then again i don't know for certain.

thanks!

aurelie

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

i think it pretty much has the same side effect profile.

if i was going to be cynical, i would point out that neurontin is about to go generic and at the same time they are releasing the new better neurontin...

but um, neuronting didn't work on me... so i'm now trying lyrica out.

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Guest Llamanator

Actually, Neurontin is currently generic. I've found the one manufactured by Teva (not sure if there are any others) to be okay.

Funny thing about Lyrica: even though it's the "New Neurontin," it doesn't work in the same way. So YMMV just with like everything else.

Mimi

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Heya,

1.  Rule of thumb is if you've tried everything else, but haven't tried clonazepam in bipolar, try it.  Of all the benzos, it's also for some reason an anticonvulsant/mood stabilizer, but not a good one.

2.  Neurontin (gabapentin, long-time generic in Canada at least) is a crummy mood stabilizer.

3.  Lyrica (pregabalin) is not available in Canada, yet.  (My usual cynicism here:  Health Canada is waiting to see how many Americans it kills before it lets the drug in to help Canadians.)

--ncc--

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Heya,

This is what happens if I stay up past my 2200 bedtime.

Clozaril (clozapine) is what I meant when I said if you haven't tried it, try it.

Yes, all the benzos have some AP/MS actions.

I need to go to sleep.

--ncc--

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What are AP/MS symptoms from klonopin?

What is it bad long term?

is it worse then ativan/better?  What if you need a benzo?

Heya,

This is what happens if I stay up past my 2200 bedtime.

Clozaril (clozapine) is what I meant when I said if you haven't tried it, try it.

Yes, all the benzos have some AP/MS actions.

I need to go to sleep.

--ncc--

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

[edit:format ~navy]

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What are AP/MS symptoms from klonopin?

What is it bad long term?

is it worse then ativan/better?  What if you need a benzo?

klonopin doesn't cause AC/MS symptoms... it fixes them.  klonopin can work as an ant-convulsant and/or mood stabilizer.  it's not really the best med to be your primary anti convulsant or mood stabilizer, but it can join in the party and provide that kind of action if you need it

did that make any sense?

penny

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I have been Rx'd extra klonopin when getting manic. Does not work like an atypical antipsychotic like Zyprexa to kill mania in its tracks, but I have taken higher doses in some crisis moments.

And while benzos do have addcitive properties, and tolerance can be an issue, under control of a pdoc benzos can and are used long term. Many pdocs will not Rx them long term because of the reasons above but I have taken klonopin long term, still do, and as long as you take them as Rx'd and do not get in the habit of popping extra benzos when you feel the need to, under a doc's care  some people can take benzos long term for anxiety.

Also, would make sure you get help to figure out exactly what the seizure like episodes are, can make a big difference in what med may be the best.

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Heya,

Important I think to recall that --

-- although some medications have more potential for addiction than others (nobody much gets addicted to their blood thinners)

-- that potential is only turned into addiction in some people.

With my family hx, it would be the height of stupidity for me to take anything that has addictive potential, without tight supervision (weekly Rxs, etc).

Most people are just fine taking meds with addictive potential, just as many people (not including me) can have one glass of wine with dinner.

Tolerance is just a chemical reality.  With some meds (morphine and its friends come to mind) it takes larger and larger doses over time to get the same effect.  By itself, this is generally okay, but s/e can becomea problem.

Dependence is also a chemical reality.  As soon as the med starts to wear off, the only way to feel better is to take more of it.  Withdrawals,  like DTs, signify physical dependence.  The body doesn't remember how to function without the drug.

Addiction is strange and hard to define, hard to fight.

A complicated mix of chemical and psychological (whatever psychological means) factors.  What makes us drink when we know it makes things worse.  What makes it so hard to stop long after the withdrawals are over.

Don't know what I'm trying to say here.

Just that it's important to know that even an "addictive" drug like benzos does not on its own cause "addiction."

I think it's important.

--ncc--

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