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How does being morbidly obese cause depression?


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I'm looking for scholarly articles about how being obese and morbidly obese can cause differences in brain chemicals which can create depression.  

I am not thinking along the lines of people becoming isolated or self-loathing as neither of those things really affects me.  

I've just noticed that with my newest wave of weight gain which has been sticking around for a while that i have felt a bit more dull.  I feel sedated.  i wouldn't say its depression or even dysthymia .  its just a lack of joy at times when I tend to be a very joyful person.   

I am putting this in the depression section because I feel like my affliction is on the depression spectrum somewhere around a level 2 or 3.  There really is not a depression scale to my awareness but I am just trying to give you a better idea of what i'm feeling.  The scale would be 1-10.  5 would be dysthymia and 10 would be major depression.  0-1 would be normal- whatever that person's baseline is supposed to be.  

I only read about cortisol being increased with increased weight gain.  I wonder if there are other chemicals involved in this.

Also, if you were me would you ask about a Wellbutrin increase?  

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I was going to refer you to the cortisol connection but I see you've already noted that. Cortisol is increased in obese people and in depressed people. That would be the angle I'd follow up on.

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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2858344/

I think stress has to do with the brain chemicals in some way.

About how stress can cause obesity ...

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Summary

The present review provides evidence for the relationship between chronic stress, alterations in HPA activity, and obesity. Understanding these associations and its interactions with other factors will be important in developing effective treatments for obesity and related metabolic diseases.

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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4150387/

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All together, these findings suggest that chronic high-fat feeding promotes negative emotional states and potentiates condition for enhanced sensitivity to stress that leads to continuous repetitive cycles of overeating, weight gain, and depressed mood.

 

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Micronutrients, such as thiamine (vitamin B1), iron, and folic acid, play a role in emotion. Thiamine containing foods influence mood states (Benton et al., 1995). Improved thiamine status increases well-being, sociability, and overall energy levels. Insufficient amounts of thiamine are associated with impaired mood and cognitive functioning ...... ..............Iron deficiency represents one of the most common nutritional problems worldwide. Iron deficiency anemia can result in depressed mood, and problems with attention and lethargy

 

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Folic acid plays an important role in the brain. Folic acid deficiency is associated with depressed mood (Coppen and Bolander-Gouaille, 2005; Young, 2007). Psychiatric patients often run the risk of developing folic acid deficiency due to loss of appetite from anticonvulsant drugs that inhibit folic acid absorption (Ottley, 2000). Collectively, these findings suggest foods influence mood.

 

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These changes also lead to neurobiological impairments affecting mood disorders such as depression and anxiety (Weber-Hamann et al., 2002; Van Reedt Dortland et al., 2013a,b). It is believed that increased circulating plasma fatty acids such as palmitic acid enters the brain and impairs neurological function (Tsuboi et al., 2013). Palmitic acid impairs leptin and insulin receptor signaling in the hypothalamus and promotes weight gain (Benoit et al., 2009; Kleinridders et al., 2009). Under these circumstances, obesity is promoted, as well as a negative emotional state. In addition, leptin and insulin have been noted to influence mood

 

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Thus, saturated fats stimulate HPA disturbances and/or inflammation, leading to anxiogenic-like behavior in animals and depression in humans.

 

^^^ These quotes are just a few that describe the chemicals in the brain and obesity. 

I highly suggest reading the entire thing to get more of an idea of how obesity and depression come together.  There is a lot of interesting material that I think can answer at least in part about depression.

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Not sure about asking about an increase of Wellbutrin or not.  I'd ask pdoc about that.  IME, Wellbutrin IR is the only one that works for me.  I didn't have an effect from the SR and XL kind.

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Cortisol is supposedly released upon waking, generally making you more alert and hungry. I do not experience this at all. I've had terrible insomnia since I was I little tyke, and I only very rarely get hungry during the morning. I need calm, quiet, and darkness when I get up, for 2-3 hours at least. And I'm really lethargic the entire time. I rarely get hungry before the afternoon, and often will not eat anything at all until quite late at night. But when you sleep very little, it's a different world. 

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