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Is anyone scared abt the adderall heartattacks


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:embarassed: The adderall and add meds may have caused 40 deaths due to heart attack and highblood pressure.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Where did you read this?  I am not really sure where to find this info.

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If I was gonna keel from a drug related heart attack, it'd have been from the copious amounts of ritalin I was fed as a child or the recreational drugs in my early 20s.

My guess would be the numbers are actually a bit low. Just cause about 15 years ago, if you had an unruly kid, you just fed them Vitamin R till they stopped or died.

That's a bit of an exaggeration...but not by as much as I wish it were.

Of course, you also have to take recreational use into account.

I have a friend that's not ADHD in any way shape or form, but fakes it to get adderall. He goes through his month rx in about 2-3 days.

He brags about faking it. That's not an armchair diagnosis on my part. ;)

Those are the people that make the death count for any drug iffy at best.

Edited to alter a syntax that made a sentence confusing, even to the person that wrote it.

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Were you referring to an article like this one, Secrets?  I wasn't able to find the precise statistic you've cited.  Articles like the one I've linked show that there is reason for caution in prescribing stimulants, but not that patients have a (random number pulled from air) four per cent chance of suffering sudden death on Adderall. 

Meds are serious business.  Doctors ought to be cautious when prescribing medication to patients at all times.  Before putting me on lithium, for example, my psychiatrist ran tests to ensure my kidneys, thyroid, and heart were normal.  Before prescribing a drug which can raise blood pressure, a doctor ought to examine a patient for cardiac risk.  It's common sense which some practicioners, unfortunately, neglect. 

I took Vioxx for two months after it was pulled from the market, and still wish it would come back.  Risks are often blown out of proportion.

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Sorry. This is a sort of lazy post, but I found a couple things on what you are talking about, including an article that discusses why Adderall was temporarily pulled in Canada.

~navy~

In the October 11, 2005 edition of the Canadian Medical Association Journal ("CMAJ"), an article by Wayne Kondro reveals that Health Canada reintroduced Adderall (amphetamine salts) to the Canadian market in August 2005 not because the agency found Adderall to be safe but, rather, because "an independent panel found it impossible to accurately ascertain whether the drug increases the risk of cardiac death."
http://www.drug-injury.com/druginjurycom/2...h_canada_p.html

However, the report noted, the rare occurrence of sudden death in children treated with drugs for ADHD
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Looks pretty damns safe to me!

1.79 deaths per million users is a helluva lot better than aspirin!

Lets rule out some risks for you:

- You aren't a child. None of those statistics pertain to you.

- Do you have hypertension (high blood pressure) that appeared after you started the med?    No?  Then that doesn't apply to you.

- Do you have any pre-existing cardiac conditions?  No?  Keep reducing risk.

- Do you have any pre-existing cerebrovascular (brain) abnormatlies? No?  Keep reducing risk.

We've got you down to next to nothing in the way of risk. Relax, enjoy the sanity. 

A.M.

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:embarassed: The adderall and add meds may have caused 40 deaths due to heart attack and highblood pressure.

I think the dangerous (actually, not potentially) ADD meds are desipramine and imipramine, because they indeed have a risk of fatal arrhytmia due to (I think) sodium channel blocking in overdose. What's more, you can't exactly predict the overdose, because some other meds (like cimetidine and paroxetine) seriously increase blood desipramine levels. That's why they're rarely used anymore. Keeping that in mind, the deaths from those meds aren't as common as from, say, Tylenol, and I've used desipramine successfully for fart control for months. I have no pre-existing heart risk factors though, and I was pretty careful not to use any particularly high dosages (despite my doctor telling me I can safely go up to 200mg).

Stimulants like Adderal may have negative effects on blood pressure, but they're usually mild and don't create a significant problems, unless you already have some risk factors (like heart disease running in a family).

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Looks pretty damns safe to me!

1.79 deaths per million users is a helluva lot better than aspirin!

Yeah, more people probably die choking on peanut M&Ms. My very first psych professor was a nut about factoids and research and the integrity of same. What method did they use? Has the study been duplicated with the same results? How many subjects did they study? She beat that (quite literally...not  ;) ) into us. I think that was the best thing I got out of that class, or, I should say the thing I remember and has stuck with me. The reliability and credibility of research.

Now, speaking of ADD, in a general way...I keep forgetting if I took my pills--I have to go get one of those old lady Sun-Mon pill container thingees. I will take my pills and not remember 1 minute later if I took my pills.

I think this is brain damage from all those OTHER drugs Seldarin made reference to...

<sigh>

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ADHD Drugs are Generally Safe, Some Doctors Say Ahead of FDA Panel

By Susan Heavey

WASHINGTON (Reuters) Jan 06 - Drugs to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are generally safe, some doctors said on Thursday after U.S. health officials announced a meeting to discuss possible heart risks.

"It's not a big deal for patients without a cardiac history," Dr. Adelaide Robb, a psychiatrist at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, told Reuters.

MOST DOCTORS WATCH FOR PROBLEMS

The drugs used to treat the disorder have been around for decades and, overall, help patients more than they harm them, several psychiatrists said.

"Everybody knows that these medications, at higher-than-normal doses can have effects on the heart," Dr. Robb said.

She added that most doctors already watch for possible heart and other problems, but more data and possible label changes could help alert parents about the link.

Dr. Andrew Adesman, a behavioral pediatrician at New York's Schneider Children's Hospital, said the FDA panel is important, but the heart risk doesn't affect his practice. "At this point we don't have any credible data to suggest there's any increased risk," he said.

Drug Company Wants More Study on ADHD Side Effects

LONDON (Reuters) Feb 10 - Shire Pharmaceuticals Group Plc said on Friday it wants further study to determine if there are adverse effects from Adderall for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) after a U.S. advisory panel said such drugs should carry strong warnings.

The committee narrowly voted on Thursday to recommend the warning even though members agreed it was unclear if the drug contributes to sudden deaths, myocardial infarctions and other complications.

"While we fully support full disclosure and adequate warning, Shire believes that the interests of physicians and patients would be better served by further study to determine whether there is, in fact, a relationship between these medicines and cardiovascular events," Shire said in a statement.

"Obtaining this information is crucial prior to taking what would be an unprecedented action to include something in a black box that has not been supported by sufficient data."

The Food and Drug Administration will consider the panel's recommendation for a black box warning for the drug. The committee voted 8-7 in favour of the warning, with one abstention.

Shire said Adderall already carries a black box saying misuse of amphetamines may lead to sudden death or serious cardiovascular events and it believes that further action is unwarranted.

**Be careful about what the media reports and what they don't.

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Guest Llamanator

Yep. A lot of things are potentially dangerous. The media likes to make things seem frightening, often exaggerating the situation, to elicit an emotional reaction from its audience.

Going out in a vehicle is dangerous. Being a pedestrian is dangerous. Taking a shower during a thunderstorm isn't a particularly good idea. Neither is not having appropriate winter gear when traveling in the cold. I mean, you could get hit by lightning. Taking a couple of Tylenol after those few drinks could play Bust-a-Move with your liver. Hell, eating at the local buffet is potentially dangerous.

There are deaths associated with most, if not all medications. Just another chance. Typically a very, very low one. As has been mentioned, a good doc will screen for potential risk factors before prescribing anything.

Want to be really safe, never leave your house, stay away from outlets, keep yourself insulated in a plastic bubble, never come into contact with anyone, and test your food for bacteria, parasites, and viruses before every time you eat it.

If you want to be really fucking paranoid about something, be paranoid about telephones. They are tools of evil.

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  • 1 month later...

... Taking a shower during a thunderstorm isn't a particularly good idea. ...

If you want to be really fucking paranoid about something, be paranoid about telephones. They are tools of evil.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Talking on a telephone during a thunderstorm is a bad idea too.  Sounds like an urban legend, but ...

my parents' house was once nearly set on fire by lightning hitting the phone line (only had some

scorched panelling and a small grass fire, IIRC)

Come to think of it, the phone box on my house is better-grounded than some house electrical

systems in other states, and getting the electrical service up to code was non-trivial (The copper

rodS were probably pounded in all the way to the water table. And I STILL have 20-50V stray

current dancing in the wires.  At least I no longer have a fuse box connected to the shower. )

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  • 2 weeks later...

I found that Adderall made my muscles tense, my pulse go up, and maybe a mild elevation of BP. I put up with it and the symptoms went down. If someone is having this kind of trouble, maybe better to start with smaller dose. Sensitivity to this stuff varies widely.

I tried Ritalin first and it scared the shit out of me, but I think if I'd stuck with it it would have gotten  milder pretty fast.

Amphetamines have been around for ages (where ages = maybe the age of my father). At least for adults, we are NOT likely to discover large risks. In my case, I tend to work out more, and do better remembering my heart meds (!), so it's probably a net increase in safety for me.

I think a lot of this news testifies to the general lack of education about statistics. Lottery ticket sales do too. I'm no exception, I have not studied statistics formally, but have picked up some fairly simple notions as I went along.

If you take tens of millions of people, and something happens to 40 of them, it's going to be pretty hard to prove causes, at least if it's allegedly from something common to all of them.

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