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Anyone try Melatonin for sleeping?


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SO I looked and didn't see if anyone tried melatonin for sleeping.  Apparently, there are 1 and 3 mg tablets.  I'm going on the 1mg tablets because I can't get a good night's sleep for anything.  Everything else is sorta under control (finally), so I'm really hoping it works like it says it does. 

Anyone else have any experieces with it?

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Heya Andrew,

Never tried it.

But a sleep specialist who talked to us at a conference uses it a lot in his patients.

He *did* caution us that he imports it from Germany b/c North American versions are unreliable re. quality, ingredients, and quantity of actual drug.

--ncc--

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It works for me, but makes me horribly depressed if I use it more than one night. If you don't have problems with depression you should be fine. My dad  uses it and it works for him without side effects. It's not available here though, so we have to ask friends that go to US to bring us some.

You might wanna check this site out:

http://www.umm.edu/altmed/ConsSupplements/...tml#Precautions

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I've found melatonin amazingly helpful for the very occasional bout of insomnia or delayed sleep phase. The real trick of this drug, which for some reason isn't printed on the bottle and many doctors don't even seem to emphasize, is that it *must* be taken at the right moment in your current (not your ideal) circadian cycle. Specifically, it should be taken when your natural melatonin is peaking, so that it reinforces the peak. It can be taken a little earlier (like an hour max) to shift the peak earlier (as with delayed sleep phase or jet lag). Taking it farther apart than this can *seriously screw up* your circadian cycle and make it even harder to sleep.

You can tell when you're natural melatonin peak is because it's when you get more tired or sleepy. You can't concentrate as much, maybe you yawn or your body is slumping, your senses are reduced.

Depending on how low your natural melatonin production is, taking the supplement may push you above normal ranges, which indirectly reinforces serotonin production as well (the two hormones/transmitters are closely tied together and to the sleep/wake cycle). In a simplified way, you could almost think of serotonin as increasing wakefulness/mania, and melatonin as increasing sleep/depression. Obviously we are all supposed to swing between these poles daily, but pushing these chemicals around may swing you too far in one direction or the other. Melatonin can have a depressive effect (while also increasing the vividness and depth of dreams), but it is probably the right direction to push if you're chronically sleep-deprived. It may be good to take for 1-5 days, but longer term is not a good idea as it's very potent.

Hope this info helps.

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Actually, it should help you stay asleep too. It's *the* hormone that our bodies naturally use to control sleep. But there are some reasons you might have trouble staying asleep that shouldn't be masked with a drug, like sleep apnea. You might want to see a sleep specialist.

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Depending on how low your natural melatonin production is, taking the supplement may push you above normal ranges, which indirectly reinforces serotonin production as well (the two hormones/transmitters are closely tied together and to the sleep/wake cycle). In a simplified way, you could almost think of serotonin as increasing wakefulness/mania, and melatonin as increasing sleep/depression.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Serotonin is the precursor to melatonin (through acetylation and methylation),

so it makes sense that increasing melatonin levels would indirectly

increase serotonin - less of one has to be consumed to make the other.

IIRC, part of the daily sleep signal is a drop in both serotonin and noradrenaline

levels.  Pushing serotonin high and holding it there would be a good way to

induce insomnia (and dysphoria/dysthymia as dopamine levels drop).

I'll also agree that long-term melatonin supplementation might be a bad idea.

Over time, the brain should start cutting back its melatonin production to get

levels back to what it considers  normal.  At that point, you'd start to need

the melatonin supplement just to sleep as well as you don't now.  Taking it

once in a while when you really need it, and in sync with your normal sleep

cycle should work just fine (as long as you are not on an MAOI).

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