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how many time have u had your diagnosis changed?


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Depends on which one you're talking about. The psychosis diagnosis has changed 4 times at least. My Asperger's diagnosis has changed possibly three times since one never really mentioned it at all - although it doesn't necessarily make it void - more recently it was changed to Autism Spectrum Disorder, I'll still call it Asperger's though. My depression and anxiety diagnosis has recently changed to Mixed Depression and Anxiety. So altogether possible 8 times. 

That's in a space of two and a half years as well.

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Each doc has their pet Dx's that they like to use and insurance influences what your Dx as some Dx's are less likely to be rejected. Some DX's give you greater access to treatment, labs, and med's but this changes with time.  Diagnosis is about money when you get down to it. 

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Seems they used to get added but never subtracted. I'm not convinced I changed but rather was misdiagnosed. I've had several changes or at least additions and I'm not totally clear what all the current diagneses are. I guess one is considered active?  But to me, some of the diagnoses are bothersome but get ignored, like my anxiety. So I've had about six diagnoses over time, some I've agreed with, some I've disputed. 

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The DSM is such a tangled knot of overlapping positive/negative symptoms.. and we can all be telling the truth, while giving contradictory answers, from one appointment to the next. Everything is in constant flux for how we feel depending on which direction the illness, or stress, or medication, or anything.. has steered us.

The medical professionals are often left trying to fling a rubber band blindfolded and hit the moon with it. 

Well, that was my experience.

My diagnosis evolved as the symptoms evolved.. and everything constantly conspired to change the symptoms. 

Was I misdiagnosed? Probably many, many times. The likely culprit was that the illness was still developing. Maybe I was completely out of my mind when I was being evaluated. When I got sick, I lost weight and my medications nearly killed me. (Didn't need any help in that department at the time..)

I went through a very lengthy trial and error phase trying to get the illness to the 'maintenance' stage.

It's been 16 years since my brain melted, if I went to 10 doctors tomorrow, I would still get 10 different answers.. probably 4 or 5 different diagnoses. And, thanks to the marvels of the DSM, all of them would be correct.. well, partially. 

I say let the doctors get some exercize by throwing their darts at the chart for creatively naming the culprit. Often, it's entirely irrelevant what they call it. Type A, Type B, major this, minor that, has features of, on and on.. its all a lanuguage that we can never fully comprehend, why? Because one doctor point out something that is a 'critical defining feature'.. and the next will completely dismiss that exact same thing. And, the DSM will STILL support both findings, depending on the diagnosis.

The treatment methods and/or medications often overlap from one column of diagnosis to the next closely related one. And, the meds all work differently, on different people, at different times, for different reasons.

So many variables.

Recognize and treat the symptoms as they appear. Adjust accordingly to how the symptoms react.

Nobody know you better than you. And, even if you don't even know yourself, you know what state of mind feels comfortable to you -- and to those around you.

Find a treatment staff that will work together - with you - to achieve that goal. 

I apologize for the huge inferrence of distrust in the medical system within my answer. Without proper perspective, it can certainly be an extremely frustrating maze to navigate. I do believe the medical system is there to help. I also know it was a total nightmare for me. I chased my tail and never caught it.

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1 minute ago, Lms-Kaz said:

The DSM is such a tangled knot of overlapping positive/negative symptoms.. and we can all be telling the truth, while giving contradictory answers, from one appointment to the next. Everything is in constant flux for how we feel depending on which direction the illness, or stress, or medication, or anything.. has steered us.

The medical professionals are often left trying to fling a rubber band blindfolded and hit the moon with it. 

Well, that was my experience.

My diagnosis evolved as the symptoms evolved.. and everything constantly conspired to change the symptoms. 

Was I misdiagnosed? Probably many, many times. The likely culprit was that the illness was still developing. Maybe I was completely out of my mind when I was being evaluated. When I got sick, I lost weight and my medications nearly killed me. (Didn't need any help in that department at the time..)

I went through a very lengthy trial and error phase trying to get the illness to the 'maintenance' stage.

It's been 16 years since my brain melted, if I went to 10 doctors tomorrow, I would still get 10 different answers.. probably 4 or 5 different diagnoses. And, thanks to the marvels of the DSM, all of them would be correct.. well, partially. 

I say let the doctors get some exercize by throwing their darts at the chart for creatively naming the culprit. Often, it's entirely irrelevant what they call it. Type A, Type B, major this, minor that, has features of, on and on.. its all a lanuguage that we can never fully comprehend, why? Because one doctor point out something that is a 'critical defining feature'.. and the next will completely dismiss that exact same thing. And, the DSM will STILL support both findings, depending on the diagnosis.

The treatment methods and/or medications often overlap from one column of diagnosis to the next closely related one. And, the meds all work differently, on different people, at different times, for different reasons.

So many variables.

Recognize and treat the symptoms as they appear. Adjust accordingly to how the symptoms react.

Nobody know you better than you. And, even if you don't even know yourself, you know what state of mind feels comfortable to you -- and to those around you.

Find a treatment staff that will work together - with you - to achieve that goal. 

I apologize for the huge inferrence of distrust in the medical system within my answer. Without proper perspective, it can certainly be an extremely frustrating maze to navigate. I do believe the medical system is there to help. I also know it was a total nightmare for me. I chased my tail and never caught it.

i actually sympathize because i feel like i am chasing my tail. I feel like no one can figure out whats wrong. Then people wash their hands of me, or just use my insurance to collect payments. All the while im suffering and getting worse. My world is spinning, life is uncomfortable. But no one cares, no one wants to figure it out. 

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6 minutes ago, looking for answers said:

i actually sympathize because i feel like i am chasing my tail. I feel like no one can figure out whats wrong. Then people wash their hands of me, or just use my insurance to collect payments. All the while im suffering and getting worse. My world is spinning, life is uncomfortable. But no one cares, no one wants to figure it out. 

I have found that I have a very unique perspective on things that tends to grind against the grain. 

Feeling better requires a commitment to yourself. If you are not getting the support you feel you require, either stomp your feet, or knock on different doors to try elsewhere. If you are limited by your insurance, work around it by finding a sliding-scale facility.

Mental illness tends to deprive the afflicted of every attribute they need to participate in their own treatment. The politics of it all is so utterly debilitating. 

I have to remind myself that its not all 'corporate america is exploiting the ill to get rich at the expense of our collective sanity'.. There are people, places, and resources available that truly understand that obstacle course. And, it takes an insane amount of effort to find that needle in the haystack.

Believing in yourself will inspire others to want to be a part of your treatment. If I could rewind to the beginning, rather than losing faith in humanity, that is the one thing I would tell myself.. "Don't give up!"

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It's crazy that there is so much of a burden put on the person living in the madness to be able to explain things in a way that makes it easy for the ones who are asking the questions to drop us into a well-fitting diagnosis.

They have no way of knowing, feeling, thinking, or any point of reference, to accurately comprehend what we are saying or doing.

It all ends up being black or white to them. Yes or no.

I would have loved to find a well rounded schizoaffective therapist who has had a nasty bout of mania, survived through suicide attempts in the midst of their psychosis, threw their entire life away as a consequence of the illness.. and THEN went to school, completed an advanced degree, and evolved to maintain reasonable stablity in their life.

I searched and searched locally. If there are any, it isn't in their personal online lists of accomplishments or accolades.

So, we gotta make the best with the options we have. And.. that ain't easy!

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37 minutes ago, Iceberg said:

I've had mood NOS, MDD, autism spectrum, Anxiety NOS, BP 2, BP 1, and personality NOS...seems like nos means no idea

The dreaded NOS. There is the doctors dart I was referring to above. 

"Well, I'm sorry, you don't fit well in any column that we have listed here for available classification options.. hang in there, might take a while, but.. we will get to the bottom of this one!" 

Honestly though, in my own experience, the whole NOS thing is when I was all over place in my symptoms. I had myself convinced I had a brain tumor that was about to burst?! Didn't matter how many times they looked for it. They couldn't find it. I knew it was there! Just read the charts.. they put it there! 

I was.. poof.. gone. Psychosis. 

But, I had so many other attributes that didn't fit. The week before, I was still working. Still taking reasonably decent care of myself. And, there I was in front of them, contradicting everything on my previous medical history, lost in my own head of delusions.

They had to rewrite everything they suspected might be going on. End result.. (temporary) NOS. Different diagnosis once the onset was deciphered.. The debate over the cause.. did prescriptions play any role? Was is past trauma resurfacing? Current stressors? Was I not being fully honest with them now? Was I not fully being honest with them before? Was I not describing things well enough? All of the above. The illness was evolving.

And then.. how to treat it? Uggghhhh..

So many variables.

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first dx social anxiety (which has stayed) added psychosis nos  changed to bipolar 1 changed to schizoaffective, bipolar type

For me they changed when my pdocs had more info (sza had always been there as a rule-out)

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My diagnosis has never changed. Additional diagnoses such as OCD and social anxiety were added, but the core diagnoses of anxiety and depression have been with me since I was 12.

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Count me as another with a dx that stuck. I've been pretty clearly depressed, anxious and socially phobic/anxious since I was a teenager. In college I got ADHD added when I did a formal psychological assessment (which included discussion of my childhood behaviours).

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1 hour ago, Geek said:

Count me as another with a dx that stuck. I've been pretty clearly depressed, anxious and socially phobic/anxious since I was a teenager. In college I got ADHD added when I did a formal psychological assessment (which included discussion of my childhood behaviours).

mine has alwasy meen anxiety with depression.......then adhd has been floated......but now with a new tdoc doing psych assessments hes thinking cyclothymia........

 

when u say psychological assessment what do you mean? dont you get assessed by all dr's?

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I went from depression to bipolar 1. It was a combination of the illness developing, and my inability to recognize mania.

I've been diagnosed with panic disorder too, many years ago, but thankfully it resolved and never returned. 

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6 hours ago, miga7 said:

I went from depression to bipolar 1. It was a combination of the illness developing, and my inability to recognize mania.

I've been diagnosed with panic disorder too, many years ago, but thankfully it resolved and never returned. 

so the panic disorder is gone, thats great!

care to explain the inability to recognize the mania? does it make sense now? can u recognize it now? do you agree with the diagnosis

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22 hours ago, looking for answers said:

when u say psychological assessment what do you mean? dont you get assessed by all dr's?

I had formal testing done for learning disabilities while trying not to acknowledge that my depression was out of control. I was referred to a local university's psychological assessment program by my gdoc. At the time I was not seeing a pdoc. Over the course of about 6-8 hours they did really thorough interviews, a lot of different kinds of testing, and reviewed what (meager) records I had. I came out with a dx of ADHD, depression, general and social anxiety, scores on various tests including IQ and a recommendation of ways that my university could help me improve my performance. I took the paperwork with their recommendations to get accommodations at school, which helped me. My gdoc changed her approach to my psych/MI care and also added a stimulant. 

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30 minutes ago, Geek said:

I had formal testing done for learning disabilities while trying not to acknowledge that my depression was out of control. I was referred to a local university's psychological assessment program by my gdoc. At the time I was not seeing a pdoc. Over the course of about 6-8 hours they did really thorough interviews, a lot of different kinds of testing, and reviewed what (meager) records I had. I came out with a dx of ADHD, depression, general and social anxiety, scores on various tests including IQ and a recommendation of ways that my university could help me improve my performance. I took the paperwork with their recommendations to get accommodations at school, which helped me. My gdoc changed her approach to my psych/MI care and also added a stimulant. 

that's great are u in usa? is gdoc the general

doc?

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  • 4 weeks later...

 For me my diagnosis changed a few times. It started out, if I can recall correctly, first episode psychosis, then psychosis NOS, then attenuated psychosis, then we added on depression, OCD, social anxiety, and general anxiety. then attenuated psychosis became full on psychosis, then it went away, not because I got better but because another doctor said I never had it in the first place. Finally they added illness anxiety disorder, because of reasons.

so that makes me an anxious, depressed hypochondriac so far. it has only been 10 months since my brain went all fuckey on me, so lets see how much it changes after this. 

 

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On 8/8/2017 at 7:10 PM, Wonderful.Cheese said:

For me, first depression then bipolar then SZA bipolar type. So three changes in over 12 years maybe? (If you don't count my teenage depression years when I saw professionals...then it would be longer than 12 years) Anxiety has always been in the mix, however. 

This is more of an evolution of diagnosis that they come to after exteneded observation.

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