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Doing a bit of research it appears that what we eat is in direct relation to our condition.

I need to lose weight as medication has put me way over the ceiling weight that I should be at.

I plan to follow the keto diet with all sorts of good things like meats , cottage cheese , eggs , regular cheese,sauerkraut , jerky , salami,green vegetables ,salads and more.

I know this is probably not an ideal diet for bipolar people , but my first priority is to get the weight off.

Does anyone know of a bipolar diet , with items that we should and should not eat.?

Thanks in advance

Edited by robin red
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I haven't heard of any particular diet for bipolar people, but you should ask your doctor if s/he has any opinion about what would be best for you, or better yet, consult a nutritionist.

I have noticed that my eating habits, which are already pretty weird, get weirder when I'm symptomatic, either depressed or manic. When I'm manic, I have no use for food. When I'm depressed, I lose my appetite, and anyway I can't make heads or tails of what's in the refrigerator. Sometimes the prospect of frying an egg is so daunting it makes me cry. I end up eating a lot of things people would identify as ingredients, not meals. I'm an emotional non-eater.

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On 9/4/2017 at 6:05 AM, robin red said:

Doing a bit of research it appears that what we eat is in direct relation to our condition.

I need to lose weight as medication has put me way over the ceiling weight that I should be at.

I plan to follow the keto diet with all sorts of good things like meats , cottage cheese , eggs , regular cheese,sauerkraut , jerky , salami,green vegetables ,salads and more.

I know this is probably not an ideal diet for bipolar people , but my first priority is to get the weight off.

Does anyone know of a bipolar diet , with items that we should and should not eat.?

Thanks in advance

robin red -

Here at CB, we always welcome new research, and usually ask that those who come across the good stuff include links so that we can go check it out too. Would you mind posting some links in this thread to what you've found? It sounds as if what you've come across has to do with diet rather than research concerning self-medicating via food.

 

Cerberus

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I have been told by a pdoc, when he put me on depakote years back, that low carb diets help with the weight gain associated with psych meds. I did this myself a few years back and lots heaps of weight when nothing else seemed to work. I have to do it again because after 3 years, I moved home and gained most that weight back in the stress of things. 

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1 hour ago, Gearhead said:

That's an interesting point...I wonder if there's any connection between what med you're on, what you eat, and changes in weight.

I was told sugar is really bad with depakote. Sugar normally contributes to weight gain more than anything else, and depakote amplifies that. Thats what my doctor said anyways. 

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I think keto really works wonders for many  as far as weight loss but I wonder how stuff like processed meat could help us feel better mentally.  

I feel like the diet that is healthiest for the body would also be healthy for the brain, as the brain controls the body.  

If I were eating at what I consider to be an optimal level, I might do a whole food diet that has zero refined carbs and zero manufactured, processed anything. 

 I'm just tossing out ideas. 

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Not bipolar, but I had a lot of success with a type of keto diet. I achieved a full remission from my depression and lost a lot of weight which I needed to lose. I originally went on the diet to lose the weight, but it soon became clear that the diet worked wonders for my mood. I achieved the remission without any meds. I'm not suggesting this diet for others but just stating what worked for me.

Before starting any diet, be sure to discuss it with your doctor (gdoc especially) to make sure it doesn't impact your health negatively.

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They say gut health is important to prevent depression , I'm on the keto diet, for those that have no idea what this is , basically it's a low carb high fat / protein diet.

I am now taking for liver oil 1000mg , 1ml of cbd oil , kelp tablets and a very good multi vitamin to supplement the diet.

Ill let you know my physical and mental progress as time goes on.

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I did the keto diet about a decade ago. It does work, I not only lost the depakote weight, but more in addition. Friends were getting worried that I lost too much. My experience, however, and I've heard this over and over, is that it's simply not sustainable. I fell off the diet and gained back most of the weight.

what I'm doing now is greatly increasing my veggie intake, most mornings I make something with loads of either raw or barely cooked vegetables, and sometimes some fruit. Couple that with being more aware about eating whole grains instead of refined. I'm also eating more baked/broiled fish for lean protein. I've noticed a big increase in energy for at least the first half of the day, and I'm losing weight. Nothing drastic, but 20 lbs since May; 20 more lbs, and I'll be happy. 

I would keep an eye on your cholesterol with the high fat/low carb, mine went up to 240. Really, bunches of processed meats can't be that good in the long run. 

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Strict diets are tough to sustain for long periods. I'm healthy, I usually eat a variety of all food groups (and avoid all sugary sweets, fried foods & fattening stuff). Some days I log everything on MyFitnessPal app. It actually even gives you a percentage breakdown of Carbs, Fat and Protein each day.

I find it extremely hard to make the Protein requirement. I need something quick to grab for lunch (like packaged turkey & cheese to make my own sandwich) bc I don't have time to cook a lunch everyday. I eat protein each meal everyday, yet barely make it to 25grams. I'm not sure what the "ideal" breakdown is (i.e. 30% Protein, 30% Fat and maybe 40% Carbs?) but I do know it is very difficult to eat less than 100grams of Carbs each day without feeling really tired in the afternoon! This is my experience at least. However, I don't feel hungry when I increase healthy fats (like almonds) and I eat lean proteins, lots of fiber filled veggies.

Edited by Blahblah
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On 9/5/2017 at 4:12 PM, Gearhead said:

I haven't heard of any particular diet for bipolar people, but you should ask your doctor if s/he has any opinion about what would be best for you, or better yet, consult a nutritionist.

I have noticed that my eating habits, which are already pretty weird, get weirder when I'm symptomatic, either depressed or manic. When I'm manic, I have no use for food. When I'm depressed, I lose my appetite, and anyway I can't make heads or tails of what's in the refrigerator. Sometimes the prospect of frying an egg is so daunting it makes me cry. I end up eating a lot of things people would identify as ingredients, not meals. I'm an emotional non-eater.

I have a similar problem. I'm either not eating or not eating enough. I know it because I'll  have a hypomanic episodes when I I don't eat. I know I have to eat but I can't, anxiety and confusion interfere  I end up eating high carb and sugary foodstuffs. They just hype me up more. When I'm depressed I have to be reminded to and told to eat  otherwise I don't eat at all unless my family reminds me to.

 

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On 9/8/2017 at 8:55 AM, Blahblah said:

Strict diets are tough to sustain for long periods. I'm healthy, I usually eat a variety of all food groups (and avoid all sugary sweets, fried foods & fattening stuff). Some days I log everything on MyFitnessPal app. It actually even gives you a percentage breakdown of Carbs, Fat and Protein each day.

I find it extremely hard to make the Protein requirement. I need something quick to grab for lunch (like packaged turkey & cheese to make my own sandwich) bc I don't have time to cook a lunch everyday. I eat protein each meal everyday, yet barely make it to 25grams. I'm not sure what the "ideal" breakdown is (i.e. 30% Protein, 30% Fat and maybe 40% Carbs?) but I do know it is very difficult to eat less than 100grams of Carbs each day without feeling really tired in the afternoon! This is my experience at least. However, I don't feel hungry when I increase healthy fats (like almonds) and I eat lean proteins, lots of fiber filled veggies.

how little do u eat if oyur only eating 25 g protein and 100 grams carbs

like yesterday 

I ate

392 g carbs

83g fat

271g protien

granted i eat 3200-3500 calories a day but unless your eating pure lard u cant be pushign more than 1000 calories

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I am one of those rare people that medication had absolutely no effect on my weight. Didn't gain an ounce after a couple years of the dreaded Seroquel and several others.

I don't eat a lot, but, I do eat regularly and have never devoted myself to any particular diet. I don't have any cravings for sugary or salty foods, so I have no problem avoiding them. I am not any kind of exercize fanatic, but I do get off my butt and go for long hikes through the wilderness.

Of all the research I have done with the relationship between foods and moods, what makes sense to me is keeping things simple and minimizing gluten intake. Much easier than it sounds. Flour, wheat, barley and a lot of grains are out. Gluten hides in wierd places. Salad dressings, condiments, and sauces? (It is primarily used as a binding agent or thickener in anything soupy or sticky). I haven't found anything that can't be easily substituted without losing flavor.

Oddly, there is often a lot of gluten in soaps, shampoos, toothpaste, and many medications.

I keep it simple. Less ingredients = healthier food. Easier to pronounce ingredients = healthier food. Healthier food = healthy mind, attitude, body, and emotions. 

I eat 4 or 5 small meals a day. Sometimes it's just a snack of Cheerios, nuts, cheese, fruit, or yogurt. But, yup.. I still eat my fair share of meat, potatoes, potatoes, and corn. Only difference is, I don't pile a mountain of processed mystery ingredients on top of them.

I try not to eat out much. Fast food is a heart attack in a paper sack and any decent, healthy meal comes with a ridiculous price tag. 

My only horrible dietary habit is that I drink enough coffee daily to drown a whale. Had no problem with sobriety, I am not ever gonna budge on the even the thought of giving up my precious java bean addiction!  

 

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4 hours ago, Lms-Kaz said:

My only horrible dietary habit is that I drink enough coffee daily to drown a whale. Had no problem with sobriety, I am not ever gonna budge on the even the thought of giving up my precious java bean addiction!  

Same! They told me to watch my coffee intake but I think it keeps me on a more even keel so I've kept it as is. I worry about a worldwide coffee bean blight. I read somewhere that some people actually need more acidity in their stomachs and that's probably me. I tried a high-alkaline PH diet once and was checking myself on litmus strips and everything, but the more alkaline I was the worse I felt. 

There's also those blood-type diets, where you eat certain things based on what your blood type is. I'm A+ and they said I'd do well as a vegetarian. Well, I don't think that's actually healthy so that goes out the window. So far the gluten-free seems to be the only thing that has really stuck. Get it? Ha. Ha. 

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4 hours ago, Lms-Kaz said:

My only horrible dietary habit is that I drink enough coffee daily to drown a whale. Had no problem with sobriety, I am not ever gonna budge on the even the thought of giving up my precious java bean addiction!  

 

aww.. Actually, I don't see coffee as a vice at all, it seems there are always new articles or studies promoting all the benefits.

Look at all of the goodness!... (https://www.caffeineinformer.com/7-good-reasons-to-drink-coffee)

  1. Cut the Pain
    Two cups of coffee can cut post-workout muscle pain by up to 48%. From the Journal of Pain, March 2007 (link)
  2. Increase your fiber intake
    A cup of brewed coffee represents a contribution of up to 1.8 grams of fiber of the recommended intake of 20-38 grams. From the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (link).
  3. Protection against cirrhosis of the liver
    Of course, you could just cut down on the alcohol intake. From the Archives of Internal Medicine (link). Another more recent study also showed coffee’s liver protecting benefits. link. Yet another study showed that both coffee and decaffeinated coffee lowered the liver enzyme levels of coffee drinkers. This study was published in the Hepatology Journal.
  4. Lowered risk of Type 2 Diabetes
    Those who consumed 6 or more cups per day had a 22% lower risk of diabetes. From the Archives of Internal Medicine (link). A recent review of research conducted by Harvard’s Dr. Frank Hu showed that the risk of type II diabetes decreases by 9% for each daily cup of coffee consumed. Decaf coffee decreased risk by 6% per cup.
  5. Lowered risk of Alzheimer’s disease
    There is considerable evidence that caffeine may protect against Alzheimer’s disease. From the European Journal of Neurology (link).
  6. Reduces suicide risk and Depression
    A 10-year study of 86,000 female nurses shows a reduced risk of suicide in the coffee drinkers. From the Archives of Internal Medicine (link). Another study conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health found that women who drink 4 or more cups of coffee were 20% less likely to suffer from depression. Study link.
  7. Protection against Parkinson’s
    People with Parkinson’s disease are less likely to be smokers and coffee drinkers than their healthy siblings. Just make sure you don’t get lung cancer on the way. From the Archives of Neurology (link). Even newer research out of Sweden revealed that drinking coffee reduces the risk of Parkinson’s even when genetic factors come into play. link.
  8. Coffee drinkers have less risk of heart disease. Korean researchers found that study participants who consumed 3 to 5 cups of coffee a day were less likely to show the beginning signs of heart disease. The study. Other dietary factors should also be noted as Koreans typically have a different diet than do Westerners.
  9. Coffee drinkers have stronger DNA. A study published in the European Journal of Nutrition showed that coffee drinkers have DNA with stronger integrity since the white blood cells of coffee drinkers had far less instance of spontaneous DNA strand breakage. Study abstract.
  10. Lower Risk of Multiple Sclerosis. Recent research showed that at least 4 cups of coffee a day may help protect against the development and reoccurrence of MS. It is believed that the coffee prevents the neural inflammation that possibly leads to the disease developing. The study was published in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry
  11. Coffee reduces colorectal cancer risk. Even moderate consumption of coffee can reduce the odds of developing colorectal cancer by 26%. This protective benefit increases with more consumption. The study is described in detail here.

Recent research has also shown that coffee may boost a woman’s sex drive, but the fact that it’s only been tested on rats somehow takes the shine off.

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