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Teva vs Accord clonazepam-opinions?


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Some people might already know this, but Teva has discontinued their clonazepam......Starting this month, the pharmacy I use will now be carrying the Accord brand........So my next fill, I will be getting the Accord.....I hate it when this type of thing happens.

I am trying to keep an open mind, but I have always used the Teva brand for years, and I'm a little nervous about the switch....I am wondering if it will work the same for me as Teva.

Has anyone used the Accord brand?.....If so, does it work well for you.?....How does it compare with the Teva brand, if you have used both?.....All opinions welcome......Thanks

Edited by CrazyRedhead
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My pharmacy has used Teva, Accord, and Actavis (I think it was bought out by teva) they are literally all the same. The only thing that makes me prefer the new Teva pills, the actavis pink ones, is that when split they split evenly. The accord brand sometimes crumbles when cut in half and can be uneven when split. But potency wise... They're the same.

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I worked in pharmacies for years and can honestly say I never heard anyone make kind of special request for any particular brand of clonazapem. They'll look different but in terms of how they function it'll be the same, except it'll look different. An Analogy: I know in my heart of hearts that Orijen is the best dry dog food money can buy, so I buy that, and if Orijen changed the bag tomorrow to include Comic Sans font, I'd still buy the food. The point is that if the med works for you, in all but a very small number of special cases you won't notice a difference between generics. That said, if you truly feel you do notice one, tell the pharmacist and ask for another brand. it's a common request and usually is accommodated,  especially in independent pharmacies.

Edited by La La LOLocaust
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Back when I was on clonazepam, the pharmacy would change the generic every once in a while. I never noticed a difference. Lamotrigine, however, was very different. The generic made a huge difference for lamotrigine.

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I just switched to Accord without incident. I take 1-2 mg and felt no need to increase the dose or that Accord was weaker.

I think for IR (Immediate Release) medications it is unlikely for a manufacturer to mess up. Meds that are time release are far harder to emulate the original brand. The problems with generic Wellbutrin a few years ago illustrate this. The FDA is charged with oversight over generics and are supposed to do testing to assure the new generic has the same characteristics as the original. The FDA, rightfully so, complains they do not have the resources to do this. The governments has cut the FDA's budget year after year.  

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On 10/24/2018 at 5:01 PM, notloki said:

I just switched to Accord without incident. I take 1-2 mg and felt no need to increase the dose or that Accord was weaker.

Thanks.....I will be picking up my first fill of Accord brand soon (previously got Teva).......Nice to hear that it seems to working fine for other people...

Edited by CrazyRedhead
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Just an update, took my first Accord clonazepam last night, and it seems to work just as well as the Teva......I was very pleased with it.........So, I was all nervous for no good reason, but that tends to happen a lot with me....

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On 10/26/2018 at 10:07 AM, CrazyRedhead said:

Just an update, took my first Accord clonazepam last night, and it seems to work just as well as the Teva......I was very pleased with it.........So, I was all nervous for no good reason, but that tends to happen a lot with me....

Seems fitting for someone prescribed clonazepam, yes? hehe. Happy you're okay. I had the same worries.

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  • 1 month later...
On ‎10‎/‎24‎/‎2018 at 2:57 PM, jt07 said:

Back when I was on clonazepam, the pharmacy would change the generic every once in a while. I never noticed a difference. Lamotrigine, however, was very different. The generic made a huge difference for lamotrigine.

Lamictal and Synthroid are one of those funny ones where the manufacturer makes the difference. Synthroid especially. 

When a patient starts on a generic version, it is prudent to keep them on that same one. The tiniest of incriments make a huge difference. Some people prefer the brand Synthroid (because of the switching generic fear) while we've only carried Mylan's Levothyroxine and people have been happy with it. 

I'm not too sure about the Lamictal differences. There are one or two neuros who prefer brand but I haven't heard too much about it.

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Late to the party, and never got to try accord, but found a big difference in Teva versus Actavis.

I'm very upset TEVA changed and I want it back. Tried Actavis, Solco and Teva Wafers all my pharmacy said they could order other than name.

Currently trying to get a prior auth for name brand. It's still not as good as TEVA was for me, but I'm extremely sensitive to medications and small changes.

I"m happy Accord worked for you!

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  • 2 months later...
On 10/17/2018 at 10:53 AM, CrazyRedhead said:

Some people might already know this, but Teva has discontinued their clonazepam......Starting this month, the pharmacy I use will now be carrying the Accord brand........So my next fill, I will be getting the Accord.....I hate it when this type of thing happens.

I am trying to keep an open mind, but I have always used the Teva brand for years, and I'm a little nervous about the switch....I am wondering if it will work the same for me as Teva.

Has anyone used the Accord brand?.....If so, does it work well for you.?....How does it compare with the Teva brand, if you have used both?.....All opinions welcome......Thanks

I know this is an old post, but I was wondering how the non-Teva clonazepam was working for you? Still good or not so good? I noticed I had been given then Teva brand for 6-9 months and my anxiety had been a lot better than when on the Mylan clonazepam. Well now no more Teva.

My 1 mg clonazepam pills are now yellow instead of the green Teva. I’m not sure which brand they are? But I’m assuming Accord maybe? I just can’t let my anxiety get out of control again and my life go down the gutter. I’ll be housebound basically and not able to leave unless with someone safe. I’ve come pretty far. I can’t lose this progress, small though it may be. 

Or this could be due to the clozapine helping the anxiety too. I guess who knows. 

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14 hours ago, looking for answers said:

looks like my new one is actavis elizabeth pharmaceuticals

If this Actavis doesn't work well for you, I suggest asking your pharmacist about the Accord clonazepam.....They should be able to order it for you if the Actavis doesn't do the trick.

I switched from TEVA clonazepam to Accord with no problems at all......I use CVS pharmacy and they have Accord, also I think Walmart carries the Accord, too.

Edited by CrazyRedhead
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17 hours ago, Wonderful.Cheese said:

I know this is an old post, but I was wondering how the non-Teva clonazepam was working for you? Still good or not so good? I noticed I had been given then Teva brand for 6-9 months and my anxiety had been a lot better than when on the Mylan clonazepam. Well now no more Teva.

The Accord clonazepam still works fine for me......I can't even notice a difference between the Accord and the Teva, to be honest.

Also, if your 1mg pill is yellow, it is probably the Actavis (top image)

My 1mg Accord is dark blue (bottom image)

Actavis clonazepam.jpg

 

Accord clonazepam.jpg

Edited by CrazyRedhead
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1 hour ago, CrazyRedhead said:

If this Actavis doesn't work well for you, I suggest asking your pharmacist about the Accord clonazepam.....They should be able to order it for you if the Actavis doesn't do the trick.

I switched from TEVA clonazepam to Accord with no problems at all......I use CVS pharmacy and they have Accord, also I think Walmart carries the Accord, too.

Hmm ok I’ll see what it’s like! I think the actavis is a bit better

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19 hours ago, CrazyRedhead said:

The Accord clonazepam still works fine for me......I can't even notice a difference between the Accord and the Teva, to be honest.

Also, if your 1mg pill is yellow, it is probably the Actavis (top image)

My 1mg Accord is dark blue (bottom image)

Actavis clonazepam.jpg

 

Accord clonazepam.jpg

Ok thanks for the info. Mine  is definitely actavis then.  Hmmm

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2 hours ago, Wonderful.Cheese said:

Ok thanks for the info. Mine  is definitely actavis then.  Hmmm

I would suggest just keeping an open mind and try the Actavis.....From what I've read it does work pretty well for most people.

If you notice a difference in effectiveness, let pdoc know right away.

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  • 6 months later...

Personally, I think it’s the users body chemistry and has nothing to do with the manufacturer.  I am experiencing Benzos not working and have tried diff. Manufacturers and noticed there is no difference whatsoever.

 

klonopin by accord was working great until I started using lexapro....tried klonopin by Actavis and this made no difference at all...stopped using klonopin for 5 months or so and started using klonopin again by accord and it was working......

 

had a colonoscopy few months back and again klonopin is not working again....

i swear it is a psychological thing and has nothing to do with manufacturer.

 

i am pretty annoyed because klonopin really helps my pain

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  • 1 year later...

What people need to understand is that by law, each generic of the same medication cannot have the same time release binder.. with that said, Clonazepam for example!! One generic of it could have a latuide of 120% while Another can have a latuide of 180%.

 

Others can be lower or in the middle. What this means is that the time release binder in a generic with 120%, will only contain around 50 to 60% of the active ingredient that will be absorbed by the body. While one with 180% can contain 70 to 90% of the active ingredient. What you have to understand is that this means how fast or slow the active ingredient is absorbed in the body and not how much active ingredient is in the pill.

 

If its a 1mg pill or ect, no matter the generic Manufacturer, it will contain 1mg of Clonazepam or ect. However, because each generic Manufacturer by federal law must use a different time release binder from other generic Manufacturers of the same med and name brand. A certain generic my release the active ingredient to slow.. This will be a generic that people will notice a huge difference and complain about.

 

While another generic may release the medication at a normal rate. This will be a generic that works ok for people and they really won't notice a difference. Then you will have the generic that release the medication a little faster than normal. This will be the generic that everyone wants, because it will almost be like the name brand.. Generics are not the same as name brand like doctors and pharmacist want people to think. Generics are not even the same as other Generics lol.

 

By federal law, no one generic can have the same time release binder as the name brand or even another generic of the medication. Because of that federal law. You will have poor quality generics, mid level Generics and high quality generics.. as far as why a pharmacy change up the generic Manufacturer so much is because they don't buy generics stright from the manufacturer. They buy from a wholesaler. Which ever generics, that wholesaler has is what the pharmacy will be locked into having with the wholesaler by contract. Once that contract is up, the pharmacy can than use another wholesaler and its common practice for them to use the wholesaler that gives them the best price..

 

This is why every refill or 3 refills your generic will change.. The pharmacist contract with a wholesaler can be for one month or up to 12 months.. Once the pharmacy is in that contract, by law,, they cant change wholesaler or order you the generic Manufacturer you want if their wholesaler don't already have that generic Manufacturer.. So thats why most pharmacies won't order the generic Manufacturer you want from that manufacturer. Because they are under contract to only order from the wholesaler they use and only use the generics that wholesaler buys...

 

Mom & pops/independent pharmacies can order the generic Manufacturer you want, because most times,, They don't use a wholesaler and buy their generics stright from the manufacturers.. so that is a option, stay away from the big name pharmacies if you can.. Pharmacies these days could care less if your medication is working, if its causing withdrawals while on it due to poor quality and body absorption. The pharmacy only wants to buy the cheapest generics possible and make as much money as they can while saving money. I have been on benzos for over 10 years, trust me when I tell you that I have tried almost every benzo and every generic Manufacturer. Im on klonopin right now. Teva use to be my favorite generic, when it came to klonopin, but they don't make it like they use too.

 

I take Accord health now and I must say, its better than the new teva. But not better than the old teva. However, Accord health does make good quality klonopin.. its on the top end of mid level if you ask me.. but its not a high quality generic, but its not a poor quality generic either.. When I was on Xanax, Greenstone made the best Xanax generic. Coming in at 2nd, would be Sandoz. When I was on Ativan, Watson made the best Ativan. But back to klonopin, qualitest was good for me, Actavis was also, I truly can't remember how the Sandoz klonopin was. But it couldn't had been that bad, because I would had remembered. I dont play that crap medication on meds that can cause serious withdrawals.

 

Whenever I got a bad generic, I would notify the Pharmacist asap and have them write in my file and on my bottle label to only give me the generic Manufacturer I wanted. If they would play hard ball. I would tell them im allergic to the generic Manufacturer that didnt work for me. This way, I can play hard ball back. Now, I can legally sue if they filled my prescription with that same crap generic Manufacturer. I would also write out on paper all the generic Manufacturers that I didnt want and have them put it in my file, listing allergic and bad reactions to why.. making the pharmacy only able to give me the one I wanted. I would also have my doctor write on the prescription which generic I wanted. I would also report those bad generics to the fda... Never let a pharmacy give you crap meds. Its ways around their bs.. plus, you can always use a specialty pharmacy.. they will order stright from the manufacturer you want and cut out the middle man aka wholesalers..

 

I feel like all doctors should go back to the old days when they had their on pharmacy in their office.. and for the record, when I talk about time release binders, im not talking about control release or XR.. im simply saying that by law, each generic of the same medication must have a different binder that release the active ingredient different than the next.. they are all still immediate release generics.. also each generic use different fillers and ect that also effect how the active ingredient is metabolized in the body. So its not all in your head. Yes!! These generic Manufacturers,  generics are different. Its federal law that they must be. The doctors and pharmacies know this but act like they dont.. the best thing you can do is Google a full list of generics made in India and China and stay away from them. Most are very poor quality. Most the generics nowadays in America are made in India and China. Big facts..

 

write you out a list of every generic you know sucks, and list the reason as to why you can't take it because of allergic reactions even if you're not allergic to it, then turn it in to your pharmacy and tell them to make a copy of it and put it in your file and to also write on the bottle label which generic you prefer. Thats way if you are dealing with a hole pharmacist or tec, that want to play games and have that you gone get what I give you attitude. You can then have a legal case against that pharmacy and pharmacist. You can also report that pharmacist to the board of pharmacies of your state and get that pharmacist in even more trouble and also report to the corporate office of that pharmacy and get that pharmacist in even more trouble and for one last hard hit, report that pharmacist to the Better Business Bureau...

 

These pharmacist don't care if you stuck with a 30 day or more prescription supply of bad klonopin. They don't care if you going through low to mild or major withdrawals due to poor quality klonopin. They don't care if you end up in the E.R or mental health facility due to bad klonopin. They don't care if you die. They don't care about your health treatment and if your meds are working. But they love to act like doctors and even dress like doctors. American pharmacies have sold out the American people for India and China made generics.. They only care about saving money. More advice, I can give you is to always see which generic Manufacturer or manufacturers they have in stock for klonopin before you even turn in your prescription. But if you seem to forget for whatever reason, always check the pills before you leave the store. If you not sure which generic they gave you and don't trust the pharmacy word. Google the pill Description. Drug indenifer.com... it will even list the inactive ingredients.. by the way,, once you leave the store, most pharmacies won't take them back but some will.

 

So always check the pills before you even leave the counter. Actually, you should check the pills before you even sign for them. If your doctor won't do anything like write on the prescription which generic to give or won't call the pharmacy and tell them which one to give you. Ok, handle it like this, talk with your doctor and tell you're doctor look, the bad generic im getting is making my problems worst and has me coming to you asking for a increase and making me look like a drug seeker. The bad generic makes me feel like I never even came to see you. The bad generic is not allowing you to give me good healthcare treatment and is not giving me good quality of life. But I'm telling you guys, you can all bypass all that with your doctor and pharmacist if you claim you are allergic to that generic Manufacturer. Never say you are allergic to the active ingredient though lol say you are allergic to the inactive ingredients....

 

hope I was of some help. Oh, you can talk to your doctor about helping you find a specialist pharmacy... fyi, klonopin generics i find to be very poor quality, Mylan, aurolife, all Mylan generics suck and all aurolife generics suck. Stay away. THE BEST THING WE CAN ALL DO IS REPORT ALL BAD GENERICS TO THE FDA.. THE FDA EVEN WROTE THAT THEY CANT DO ANYTHING UNLESS MORE PEOPLE COMPLAIN... We have the power to stop it people. We must all come together though and report it. Also start petentions about the matter... O want people to understand that teva is no longer the best generic for klonopin. Their new klonopin sucks.. its people like me right now that is trying to get teva to use their old formula for klonopin. So as of right now, Accord health most definitely got teva beat as far as klonopin quality. I hope you all find the best quality klonopin for you. Fyi, dont listen to any of these so called pharmacist on this form saying I use to be a pharmacist or I am a pharmacist and all generics are the same. Funny how a person that has never taken klonopin name brand or generic can tell you how the medication is working you lol thats like a person that has never smoked marijuana telling you all marijuana is the same lol them guys are to funny. But anyway, most definitely stay away from Mylan generics and aurolife generics... Stay away from. Apotex generics.. go in peace people.. 

Edited by MICHAEL 7
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Hello, @MICHAEL 7. Welcome to CB.

Your post is interesting, but the format is hard to read. A wall of text like that isn’t easy to follow. Could you edit so that there are paragraph breaks?

Please feel free to PM me if you have any questions.

Gearhead (admin)

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 5/24/2021 at 11:18 PM, MICHAEL 7 said:

I wish teva would bring back their old formula. The new teva formula is sugar pill lol

My pharmacy switched to new Teva formula some months back......I guess we're all different, but the new Teva formula clonazepam  has been working as good as the Accord did for me.....

Since the time I originally posted this thread in October 2018, my pharmacy has also carried the Actavis and the Solco clonazepam...Actavis worked pretty well for me...........The only one that didn't seem to agree with me at all was the Solco. ........Again, I think we're all different.

Edited by CrazyRedhead
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It is now June 2021.  It seems like Teva is out of the clonazepam business again.  This is really awful for so many of us who find that only Teva clonazepam is the one that works and does not cause side effects such as the ones that we are taking clonazepam in the first place.  They are trying to stick me with Par clonazepam, again.  I already have almost two months supply from a year ago that I cannot take but I did not check when I picked up the rx.  Might as well be taking nothing instead of Par because within days, you might feel anxious, depressed and all those feelings that you need clonazepam for.  Par is probably the cheapest for the pharmacies to get from the distributor.  And in case you're not aware, Par in India was cited for unsanitary conditions a few years ago.  Look it up and you will get sick to your stomach.  

Teva has been the most effective for me but if all else fails, I will have to ask my pcp for a rx for the name brand, Klonopin, and hope it works better than Par and all the other generics that are useless.  Yes, it is almost Summer 2021 and Teva has decided it's time to stop making clonazepam.  Maybe they will come to their senses and have sympathy for all of us needing Teva and nothing else.  Sad but not likely.

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11 hours ago, Friend said:

It is now June 2021.  It seems like Teva is out of the clonazepam business again.  This is really awful for so many of us who find that only Teva clonazepam is the one that works and does not cause side effects such as the ones that we are taking clonazepam in the first place.  They are trying to stick me with Par clonazepam, again.  I already have almost two months supply from a year ago that I cannot take but I did not check when I picked up the rx.  Might as well be taking nothing instead of Par because within days, you might feel anxious, depressed and all those feelings that you need clonazepam for.  Par is probably the cheapest for the pharmacies to get from the distributor.  And in case you're not aware, Par in India was cited for unsanitary conditions a few years ago.  Look it up and you will get sick to your stomach.  

Teva has been the most effective for me but if all else fails, I will have to ask my pcp for a rx for the name brand, Klonopin, and hope it works better than Par and all the other generics that are useless.  Yes, it is almost Summer 2021 and Teva has decided it's time to stop making clonazepam.  Maybe they will come to their senses and have sympathy for all of us needing Teva and nothing else.  Sad but not likely.

I don't know where you heard that TEVA is no longer making clonazepam, but it's not true......I just directly spoke with a TEVA customer service representative who tells me they have no plans to discontinue their generic version of clonazepam.....They are still making it.

If you would like to verify this, here is the link with a phone number to contact them.....You will have to listen for phone prompts and press the correct number:  https://www.tevagenerics.com/contact-us/

I have never heard of the "Par" version of clonazepam, but if it's not working for you, you can ask your doctor to specify what generic works for you when he writes the scrip or calls it in.......Getting the brand name is an option, but the TEVA clonazepam is still being made.

I also don't know what pharmacy you go to, but CVS and Walgreens, at least in my area, carry the TEVA version.

Edited by CrazyRedhead
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  • 3 months later...
On 10/24/2018 at 1:52 PM, La La LOLocaust said:

I worked in pharmacies for years and can honestly say I never heard anyone make kind of special request for any particular brand of clonazapem. They'll look different but in terms of how they function it'll be the same, except it'll look different. An Analogy: I know in my heart of hearts that Orijen is the best dry dog food money can buy, so I buy that, and if Orijen changed the bag tomorrow to include Comic Sans font, I'd still buy the food. The point is that if the med works for you, in all but a very small number of special cases you won't notice a difference between generics. That said, if you truly feel you do notice one, tell the pharmacist and ask for another brand. it's a common request and usually is accommodated,  especially in independent pharmacies.

Are you trying to say that the two same in name but by two different manufacturers makes no difference? Some times different formulas ( main ingredient, with different fillers) can cause a problem with some people. Me being one of them.

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  • 1 month later...
On 2/21/2019 at 8:38 PM, Wonderful.Cheese said:

I know this is an old post, but I was wondering how the non-Teva clonazepam was working for you? Still good or not so good? I noticed I had been given then Teva brand for 6-9 months and my anxiety had been a lot better than when on the Mylan clonazepam. Well now no more Teva.

My 1 mg clonazepam pills are now yellow instead of the green Teva. I’m not sure which brand they are? But I’m assuming Accord maybe? I just can’t let my anxiety get out of control again and my life go down the gutter. I’ll be housebound basically and not able to leave unless with someone safe. I’ve come pretty far. I can’t lose this progress, small though it may be. 

Or this could be due to the clozapine helping the anxiety too. I guess who knows. 

I happened to do a little digging because I immediately noticed a difference in my last refill of 1mg Clonazepam.  Yes, I saw the color change of the tablets but didn't give it much thought but by the 5th day, I new there was an issue......I just was not feeling right.

I looked at the brands and the last few were Accord and worked great.  This last refill was Teva and noticed a difference immediately.  I actually just thought maybe I ate something or had too much coffee but a change in brands never entered my mind.  I then thought of it yesterday and remembered it having an affect on medications.  So regardless of what some might say, my brand changed and I physically felt the difference......and this is without any pre-conceived idea to to put the thought in my mind first.

 

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1 hour ago, Dave323 said:

I happened to do a little digging because I immediately noticed a difference in my last refill of 1mg Clonazepam.  Yes, I saw the color change of the tablets but didn't give it much thought but by the 5th day, I new there was an issue......I just was not feeling right.

I looked at the brands and the last few were Accord and worked great.  This last refill was Teva and noticed a difference immediately.  I actually just thought maybe I ate something or had too much coffee but a change in brands never entered my mind.  I then thought of it yesterday and remembered it having an affect on medications.  So regardless of what some might say, my brand changed and I physically felt the difference......and this is without any pre-conceived idea to to put the thought in my mind first.

 

I'm sorry that the Teva clonazepam didn't work well for you......You can ask your pdoc to specify "Accord" generic on your script, or when he calls it in...

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