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Representative Payee


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When one receives SSDI/SSI for a mental impairment, it is possible that the issue will come up whether one will need a "representative payee" to manage one's benefits.  This can be a spouse, relative, or organization who is willing to serve as a representative payee.

Does this piss off anyone?  Like it or not, that's how the SSA works.

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The judge in my case ordered this... I was worried about my representative not wanting to let me spend my money how I wanted to, which I guess is the point... However, something got mixed up in the shuffle, and the judge's decision about a rep payee didn't make it into the actual piece of paper part of the judgement. I've gotten all my checks directly.

As far as how I feel about it goes, it's kind of one of those angel on one shoulder, devil on the other things. I understand that in filing for my disability, I'm telling the judge that there are times when I'm not in control, and I need help with the normal activities of living. This is why I can't get a job. Being told I need a representative payee makes logical sense from that point of view. BUT... It's my money dammit! I want to be able to spend it as I please. I'm an adult, and I don't need to feel like a child asking my mommy for some extra allowance when I want to purchase something. I don't want to have to account for every penny I spend to anyone but myself.

So yeah. I understand it, and in some instances, I might even appreciate it being in place, but it's really annoying and demeaning too.

I'm also not going to be making any phone calls to tell anyone that the judge actually wanted me to have a rep payee. ;)

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It doesn't piss me off; in fact, her inability to handle money was, I think, part of what helped my fiancee get SSI.

However, it CAN be a bitch to be a rep payee.  Frickin' accounting for all the money...

But, better me than some 3rd party.  I heartily agree that going to someone with your hand out every time you need something would mightily suck.

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When my youngest turns 18 next year, hubby and I will be the rep payees. He is autistic (official diagnosis PDD-NOS) and doesn't get the money thing at all.

But if my BP husband would ever get disability, well...HE is the one who is good with money. While other bp's go on spending sprees, he goes on money hoarding sprees! ;)

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When my youngest turns 18 next year, hubby and I will be the rep payees. He is autistic (official diagnosis PDD-NOS) and doesn't get the money thing at all.

But if my BP husband would ever get disability, well...HE is the one who is good with money. While other bp's go on spending sprees, he goes on money hoarding sprees! :P

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Glad there are other BPs that do that. ;)

When manic I won't buy food for days cause 'the money might run out.' It won't. But that doesn't matter. =P

I've had to be an RP for a friend for a while. (Not anymore, he's working now)

CNS is right, it's a pain in the ass.

It is necessary sometimes, and isn't demeaning if the RP doesn't make it so.

It got to the point it was a running joke with us. He'd come up and ask if I had some cash so he could 'score a hit'. In front of his family. Who were horrified, of course. :)

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  • 3 weeks later...

Well, I could see why a rep. payee would be needed for people with bipolar disorder.  Especially with poor judgment in cases of manic episodes.  But for people with regular depression and anxiety with no substance abuse who are perfectly capable of managing their money, some are still assigned representative payees.  Sure, the beneficiary can get out of it by presently a letter to the SSA from their pdoc, but then the beneficiary's case will likely be reviewed to see if their condition is still disabling---the assumption being that the condition has improved if the beneficiary no longer needs a payee.  What if the beneficiary never needed a payee in the first place?

On the other hand, some of the severe cases of regular depression and anxiety are so severe that the beneficiary will forget to pay bills and cannot take care of self on a regular and predictable basis.  In these cases, it would be necessary or beneficial to have a payee.

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  • 4 weeks later...

This is an interesting question.  When my depression was at its worst, I didn't return phone calls, didn't pay bills, didn't follow up on things that needed to be taken care of...so if I were in a different financial situation, I could have really screwed myself up.

On the other hand, I am setting up a trust to protect the assets of my cousin, who is severely schizophrenic.  He's okay with it.  I told him he can have money any time he wants it:  I don't intend to limit him at all.  But he's frugal, so that won't be a problem.

Once he's on SSI, I imagine that check will go to the county, if he's in a group home by then.

It's too bad you can't have a system where the payee could file a projected budget or something and if it's reasonable, get their own money.  And if they're in a manic phase, or in a psychotic phase (like my cousin), the representative would get the money.

Interesting question.

olga

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The representative payee is supposed to report annually how much was spent toward 1) rent, 2) food, and 3) miscellaneous expensive. If the representative payee knowingly or intentionally makes a false statement, s/he is guilty of a serious crime. The representative payee is not doing his job if he knows the money is spent on alcohol before food, shelter, and medical care is met.

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The representative payee is supposed to report annually how much was spent toward 1) rent, 2) food, and 3) miscellaneous expensive. If the representative payee knowingly or intentionally makes a false statement, s/he is guilty of a serious crime. The representative payee is not doing his job if he knows the money is spent on alcohol before food, shelter, and medical care is met.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Yes well that makes sense. Do you recall last year when I wrote here that my father sent his rep payee report for my brother in with all O's on it? That is when I wrote a letter to the field office and informed them of the situation. I did that because I was trying to help my brother be his own rep payee. They called my father in to the office, but he became so rageful that they had security walk him out. Nothing ever changed! I told them he was incapable mentally of being a good rep payee, but still they did nothing. Also, my brother is 3 states away from our father. So how can my father be a good rep payee when my brother is that far away? Apparently Social Security doesn't care.

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