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My PDoc gave me the ok to take Seroquel at night if I want, however, I'm not sure I want to go back into it. 

It's always been there as a comfort drug for me, and has saved my life before, but the eating is crazy on it, and the next day so lethargic.  I'm so down though I might try it again.

My question was for anyone that's taken it, did it give any of you more energy ?  I've heard this before on here and other sites and it surprises me since Seroquel usually knocks me out cold, but I suppose that if it is effective in alleviating depression is might actually help some people get moving?  I'd be taking lower dosages 50-100mg.....

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Posted (edited)
17 hours ago, BrianOCD said:

My PDoc gave me the ok to take Seroquel at night if I want, however, I'm not sure I want to go back into it. 

It's always been there as a comfort drug for me, and has saved my life before, but the eating is crazy on it, and the next day so lethargic.  I'm so down though I might try it again.

My question was for anyone that's taken it, did it give any of you more energy ?  I've heard this before on here and other sites and it surprises me since Seroquel usually knocks me out cold, but I suppose that if it is effective in alleviating depression is might actually help some people get moving?  I'd be taking lower dosages 50-100mg.....

From what I’ve heard, the higher the dose the less sedation. Not sure about it becoming activating though. The doses you’re mentioning I’m quite sure would sedating though. 

Edited by DammitJanet

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On 8/22/2019 at 12:42 AM, BrianOCD said:

 I've heard this before on here and other sites and it surprises me since Seroquel usually knocks me out cold, but I suppose that if it is effective in alleviating depression is might actually help some people get moving?  I'd be taking lower dosages 50-100mg.....

At 50-100 mgs, Seroquel will not function as an anti-psychotic. At that dose, all it’s doing is hitting histamine receptors. It’s going to make you tired. I take 100 mgs at bedtime.

I wouldn’t expect to see much change in appetite unless you’re up a while after you take it, in which case you may get the munchies.

If it gives you more energy, it’s going to be because you’re sleeping better. 

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Thanks for replies.  I had heard a few people say in reviews that Seroquel actually gave them energy, just wondering if anyone else can confirm that here, or most people just got knocked out?

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Like others have said, it’s reallt hard to answer that because seroquel can be so dose dependant. I personally never found it activating at any dose and I did the whole range 

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Personally, I do get extra energy from it, but I think this is due to the fact that I actually get quality sleep from it.

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seroquel is a very strong histamine blocker at low levels. As you move higher it starts hitting the 5HT-X and alpha adrenergic receptors to provide MDD/AP effects

Would you say that you have melancholic or atypical depression, with the later causes hypersomnia and psychomotor retardation. Two symptoms that without sufficient AD might make you even more tired. Add that to the strong histamine antagonism and practically nothing else and you would be sedated as hell. My theory at any rate.

Beyond sleeping well, the antidepressant effects could help energy and reduce sedation brought upon by psychomotor retardation and an increased dopamine neurotramission in the prefrontal cortex.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4423161/

Many symptoms of depression like anhedonia, psychomotor retardation, social withdrawal and loss of motivation result from decreased dopamine neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). It is believed that norquetiapine with its 5HT2A and 5HT2C antagonism facilitates dopamine release in PFC and is instrumental in relieving the depressive symptoms in patients with mood disorders.17) Dopamine reuptake in the PFC is mediated by norepinephrine transporter; norquetiapine and not quetiapine is a strong inhibitor of this transporter, thereby adding another mechanism to the parent drug’s antidepressant efficacy.18)

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