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Does the stage of your life in which you get ill determines your prognosis?


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Does the stage of life in which you get ill determines your prognosis and course of the illness? For example a person who gets ill after graduating from college and working several years will be more equipped to face life than a person who got ill and never worked (getting ill in the college stage of life or before)??

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As far as I know prognosis can differ drastically from person to person but some illnesses more commonly appear at the same time of life. Some people are diagnosed much younger, but bipolar and schizoaffective and schizophrenia all tend to appear in late adolescence. I was diagnosed at 19. Some illnesses are more severe than others but it can differ from case to case. For example, schizophrenia is considered to have a worse prognosis than schizoaffective which is considered to have a worse prognosis than bipolar. BUT that can be different for different people. Some people experience treatment resistance and thus a person with schizophrenia who is not treatment resistant might have a better prognosis than someone with bipolar who is.

I do not think it matters what time of life you were diagnosed at when it comes to determining how serious an illness is. Not only that, people who can hold a job are not necessarily better off than people who can't. Suicide is still a risk for people who can hold a job. For instance, I haven't been able to work most of my illness, but I do not consider myself a suicide risk. My grandfather who held a respectable position as a surgeon and seemingly was fine, he killed himself at 49 years old. People would not have considered him to be seriously ill from outward appearances. 

I guess what I'm saying is prognosis is different for everyone. 

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3 hours ago, saintalto said:

As far as I know prognosis can differ drastically from person to person but some illnesses more commonly appear at the same time of life. Some people are diagnosed much younger, but bipolar and schizoaffective and schizophrenia all tend to appear in late adolescence. I was diagnosed at 19. Some illnesses are more severe than others but it can differ from case to case. For example, schizophrenia is considered to have a worse prognosis than schizoaffective which is considered to have a worse prognosis than bipolar. BUT that can be different for different people. Some people experience treatment resistance and thus a person with schizophrenia who is not treatment resistant might have a better prognosis than someone with bipolar who is.

I do not think it matters what time of life you were diagnosed at when it comes to determining how serious an illness is. Not only that, people who can hold a job are not necessarily better off than people who can't. Suicide is still a risk for people who can hold a job. For instance, I haven't been able to work most of my illness, but I do not consider myself a suicide risk. My grandfather who held a respectable position as a surgeon and seemingly was fine, he killed himself at 49 years old. People would not have considered him to be seriously ill from outward appearances. 

I guess what I'm saying is prognosis is different for everyone. 

What if we do not compare one person with another but compare a person with himself/herself? Would the prognosis of the illnesss change if the same person got ill during college years vs after working for many years? Would the person be more equipped to face life challenges?

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On 10/26/2019 at 7:15 PM, Will said:
On 10/26/2019 at 7:08 PM, notloki said:

What if we don't play what if ?

I second.  

I third this.

That said, this question is addressed here. There's also research that suggests that the more mood episodes you have, the more likely you are to have them in the future. I think that suggests an answer about the hypothetical person as well.

There's more out there about this, particularly in academic and medical journals. Obviously not all of it will be true, or up-to-date, etc. Lots of articles can be found on pubmed.

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28 minutes ago, 0112358 said:

I third this.

That said, this question is addressed here. There's also research that suggests that the more mood episodes you have, the more likely you are to have them in the future. I think that suggests an answer about the hypothetical person as well.

There's more out there about this, particularly in academic and medical journals. Obviously not all of it will be true, or up-to-date, etc. Lots of articles can be found on pubmed.

I agree with that. 

Phineas Gage is interesting.  Is your user name a mathematical progression?  If so, I'll try to figure it out.  If it's random I won't

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4 minutes ago, DogMan said:

appears to be fibonacci set

Yep - I once tried it when I was signing up for some account who knows where, and was really surprised when it wasn't taken, so I kept trying it... I don't think it has ever been unavailable, actually. Really weird. I mean, considering how the internet is global and so is math.

 

53 minutes ago, Will said:

I agree with that. 

Phineas Gage is interesting.  Is your user name a mathematical progression?  If so, I'll try to figure it out.  If it's random I won't

He is interesting. Also, part of his name is part of my name. So.

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