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Do meds make you content with isolation?


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Recently, I finally found a med combo that actually does something. Now I feel somewhat ok with isolating myself. Depression isn't so bad. I have been isolated for a long time, though I can still go out and do routine things for survival, groceries and such. I don't work or go to school anymore. Before these meds it was really really bad when isolating.

Do meds actually make you want to go out there and do stuff? Do they make you content with isolation?

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Interesting question. I have become very content with isolation. Do I dare say I enjoy it? Yes, I do. I don't work, go to school... hell, I don't even drive. I stay at home out in the middle of the corn fields taking care of my kids, hearth and home. I get out 3 days a week when my husband is home from his job (truck driving) so we can get groceries, go to doctor appointments, go out to eat at a nice restraunt, visit the local flea markets and new age stores that we love and the such. Otherwise I love staying home.

In the past, before meds, I always stayed home, but I too had a horrible time with depression, mania, even paranoia over wondering what my cheating husbands were doing because they were always gone all the time (talking about past marriages). Being home and isolated used to be a very horrible thing for me to go through, but most times I had no choice, I'd be stuck there with the kids and no way of going anywhere. Which made me even more miserable.

Considering I am BD and BPD maybe being content with being isolated at home is a good thing. Afterall Borderlines are well known for having irrational fears of being alone in the world. Now I enjoy isolation... being alone... especially when the kids are in school... ahhhhh the peace and quiet!

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The thing with me is that I live at home with my parents. They can't support me forever. I'm going to have to get out there eventually. Ultimately, I feel better when I'm alone, don't have to worry about people. Though I'll worry constantly about seeing them again, co-workers, classmates, and such. It takes over my life and at the same time I get very lonely.

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Funny you should mention it. I do feel content with being isolated now. It's not a good thing for me. Before I would isolate myself due to my depression/anxiety now I'm still isolated, it just doesn't bother me anymore. Apathy inducing lexapro. I really really need to get out and around people more. It's always been so hard for me, but before I had the motivation. I was just freaked out about it. Now I don't have the motivation. I'm not sure what to do other than force myself out into the world.

Croix

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I've alway sfound isolation easier than social interaction; it's so much less demanding.  I still need people, though.  I can't be alone forever.  I continue to struggle with managing enough "face time" to keep me mentally well.  If I don't ever see people, my condition ultimately deteriorates. 

My meds have flattened me, which is what they're supposed to do... but they go a bit beyond leveling depression and mania to affecting my ability to "get" people.  This is something I have problems with.  I'm attempting to find a viable workaround.

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I think meds make everything a bit more bearable, but I think getting out and having social interactions still feels better than cabin fever. And I felt like doing that more after I started to take Prozac. Your mileage may vary. I don't tend to have huge numbers of friends I see often, though I have many friendly acquaintances and a few friends I don't see much.  Probably this puts extra pressure on my relationship with my s.o., but it's not too bad yet, and, though she actually has many more friends than I do, she feels the same way. Hers are the kind of friends who, if they find out she's sick, will drop by to see if she's ok and cheer her up.

But I digress. I think it depends on the meds, and on the person. Probably I was most sociable when on Prozac, Welbutrin, and Adderall. (The Adderall makes picking up social cues easier, it turns out. However, it also increases my emotional swings a bit, which is bearable. Especially when it was alleviating the Prozac flatness) Without the Prozac I'm crankier, but I don't miss some of the side effects. Plus, I'm a bit more energetic.

If you prefer being isolated, I'm guessing in some cases your depression is only partly alleviated. Of course, after being depressed for a long while it's hard to know exactly what normal is, and it's hard to know if you're all the way out of it unless nearby surfaces are singed by your radiance.

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Funny you should mention it. I do feel content with being isolated now. It's not a good thing for me. Before I would isolate myself due to my depression/anxiety now I'm still isolated, it just doesn't bother me anymore. Apathy inducing lexapro.
I'm in the same boat, and it does bother me at times, but usually not. For a few reasons, but mostly, after being alone for so long (not counting the life saving presence of my children) but the absence of adult companionship...it doesn't bother me. I say, "apathy or acceptance?" Does it matter which? As long as it doesn't cause me pain.

On the other hand, I have a favorite quote by that nut Balzac:

"solitude is fine, but you need someone to tell you solitude is fine."

<shrugs> We're born alone, we die alone--essentially, even though my husband died by my side...ultimately it was HIS journey...conundrum?

S9

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For me, the meds make everything, including isolation, a little less painful. That's not to say it feels GOOD to isolate, it just hurts less than it used to. I've always found it's better NOT to isolate - I always feel better if I actually talk to or see or just imagine a real live person once in a while. I dunno. We're pack animals, aren't we? Tribal? I don't buy that we're born and die alone. We're born attached to our mothers, for pete's sake - that ain't alone. Anyway, yes, conundrum. But no, I don't think it's good enough to be content with isolation. I think it's a good place to start, but in the long term I think you probably deserve to feel better.

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Heya nnxt,

Well, I always liked solitude.

Solitude is different than loneliness.

Learning that from my psychiatrist and from thinking about it a lot.

That said, social phobia is *not* useful and can stop me from doing what I need to do to feel successful, useful, accepted, belonging, blabla.

Social phobia for me is different than solitude.

This likely doesn't help you, sorry friend ;)

But thanks for bringing it up.

--ncc--

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Heya nnxt,

Well, I always liked solitude.

Solitude is different than loneliness.

Learning that from my psychiatrist and from thinking about it a lot.

That said, social phobia is *not* useful and can stop me from doing what I need to do to feel successful, useful, accepted, belonging, blabla.

Social phobia for me is different than solitude.

This likely doesn't help you, sorry friend ;)

But thanks for bringing it up.

--ncc--

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I always liked solitude too. I'm more of an introvert than anything.

I would like to be able to be around people and at the same time when I'm around people, I just want to be alone. It's a vicious cycle. I already have trouble functioning around people. Now I'm just avoiding it all together.

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