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I’m going to chime in and say freeze-dried food is excellent (from the correct manufacturer).  I recommend Mountain House. It’s good chow with a 30 year shelf-life.  Over the years I’ve found that Amazon has stocked and sold the best offerings...prices, food selections and storage friendly packaging. But I just ventured to their site and it looks like they have very limited selections most of which are being sold by third parties.  Nope, I cannot recommend Amazon right now. I do hope they get it back together eventually...it really was the best thing going.

Dagr

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It's just all been bought up. Same here, I couldn't get lentils anywhere, looked on amazon, 10 euro for half a kilo! Because all the affordable stuff is sold out.

I'm worried Amazon will use all this as an excuse to treat their warehouse workers even worse. "Bathroom breaks!? There's a global recession!!!"

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Didn’t Amazon start out as an employer that took unusually good care of their staff?  It sounds awful now...makes me think of the major electronics assembly plants in China.  

Dagr
 

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Posted (edited)

They treat their upper staff fantastic, I know people that work both in the middle and at the bottom and it's a whole different world. In the middle you get a great salary, flexitime, language classes paid for... at the bottom it's absolutely awful. I heard someone say that's just like warehouses are like, it's not, I know people that work in other warehouses and it's completely different, they are allowed to talk to each other and they are allowed to take breaks when they need to... but I still end up shopping with amazon sometimes because sometimes there's just no other option.. or the thing costs a third of the price!

Edited by Antecedent
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Dagr, our pantries must have similarities. I have those meals intended for emergency, other items for more immediate need like now. Especially since my fear is my job being eliminated as this drags on. So I stock up for financial insecurity. That’s legitimate, right?  It’s the cans of food parked in my living room that are problematic. Got to find space for them. Freeze dried is too expensive right now but I think that’ll settle out later. As in post-crisis. All the prices seem jacked up now, and even finding dog biscuits was a challenge, for some reason. I do seem to be getting my frantic buying to slow down, by necessity. 

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I will say I mostly hoard non-perishable items, but a couple things I do seem to buy and not get to—guilt over that. Lettuce mostly but not lots. I don’t think dry and canned goods are suspect. Unless you toss cans out. 

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How do I stop this?  I thought I was slowing down, but talking of getting furloughed and being required to cut my hours is just fueling the hoarding fire. I can definitely say I won’t starve any time this year, but seriously it’s ridiculous. Anyone manage to actually stop doing this?  

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7 hours ago, sugarsugar said:

How do I stop this?  I thought I was slowing down, but talking of getting furloughed and being required to cut my hours is just fueling the hoarding fire. I can definitely say I won’t starve any time this year, but seriously it’s ridiculous. Anyone manage to actually stop doing this?  

sugarsugar - How many of your purchases are impulse buys? Are they usually extra things you pick up when you go to the store that you hadn't intended to pick up  but you see and you decide to get "just in case", or are they reactions to anxious thoughts that suddenly escalate into overwhelming alarm? In both cases, a big part of the problem is disordered thinking. It may be possible for you to build self-reflecting skills through techniques like cognitive-behavioral therapy so that you can de-escalate worrisome thoughts or anxieties that lead to unnecessary purchases. The help of a therapist is highly recommended. Although underlying depression and anxiety that may contribute to such behavior can be treated by medication, hoarding as a behavior cannot. In addition, treatment of OCD my medication has not been found to affect hoarding behavior.

From a practical perspective, you can't buy with money you don't have to spend. Is it possible to put some distance between yourself and your ready availability to your money? Perhaps entrust your cards or checkbook to a trusted friend or family member so that you need to go and get them in order to use them? That way, the person would be able to help you consider whether you actually need the think you are contemplating buying/hoarding, and provide a separate perspective. You might consider also not shopping alone, for the same reason, although in the current situation some stores will permit only a single adult from a household to shop at a time. What I'm sort of asking is, is there a way you can set yourself up a kind of filter between your thoughts and your money, so that you only end up spending what you need to spend on the things you actually need to buy?

Another thing you might consider doing if you have time on your hands is to take the supplies that you've been gathering and very deliberately begin dividing them up into quantities that would be needed in a single day, or a single week. That way, you will both see that you have ample supply for your needs, and also realize how much overage you have accumulated so you'll know you really, really don't need any more.

Bear in mind that dealing with a hoarding situation and coping with hoarding behavior over the long term are two different things. If this is something that also affected you before coronavirus came to call, you would probably benefit from professional assistance, because the behavior doesn't usually stop on its own.

On the other hand, if you've never been like this before and you're just reacting to the godawful mess that we're all in, take a deep breath (take several) and remind yourself that humanity has been dealing with wars, fires, famines and plagues for at least 50,000 years, and we're still here. We're going to survive this.

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Cerberus, honestly I would say this is usually manic type behavior for me. But this is exacerbated by the whole external crisis. Hard to say what role finance insecurity/anxiety plays in making it even worse. I don’t feel otherwise manic, so haven’t been in touch with my pdoc. I’m hoping I have this under control for now. Lord knows I have a ridiculous supply of a few items. I may have to step away from Amazon. Online buying is so very easy, which isn’t always good. Especially if you are inclined to this sort of buying. Thanks for your thoughts. 

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Wanted to update and say that after a med increase I was able to sort out 20 garbage bags of stuff and have it picked up. The food however—that’s next on the list of organizing, harder because it’s all staying.   I don’t seem to have fear of furloughs hanging over me now so that should help. I’m hoping. 

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OK, next plan:  my pdoc wants me to see a therapist for this issue. I said I would, so I hope that works out. 

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